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Nutrition


a third of America’s children overweight, 25.8 million American kids and adults with diabetes and 79 million with pre-dia- betes, it’s time to start modeling healthy eating habits for our children’s future. How about beginning by making some healthy changes at the next cookout?


Plan Your Picnic As you’re probably aware, the food pyra- mid has been replaced by ChooseMyPlate (www.choosemyplate.gov). T is new plate emphasizes the need for more fruits and vegetables in our daily diet. Half the plate is fi lled with fruit and vegetables, with slightly more vegetables than fruits. You should strive for fi ve fruits and vegetables daily. Use raw and cooked vegetables of many colors. Fruits may be fresh or fro- zen, but avoid added sugars, such as fruit in heavy syrup. At your next cookout, include a veggie tray with fresh, crisp carrots, celery and broccoli served with a fat-free ranch dip. Consider some fresh watermelon or berries as well. Delicious! T e other half of the plate is divided


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evenly into proteins and grains. At least half the daily grains should be whole grains, such as whole-grain pasta or brown rice. Proteins should be lean and include fi sh or seafood a few times each week (unless allergic, or under age two). Other sources of protein include eggs, skinless poultry and lean meats. Limit animal fats, and avoid fried foods. Healthy fats include nuts, especially walnuts and almonds (unless allergic), as well as extra- virgin olive oil. For a cookout, you can


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prepare a skewer of grilled shrimp and chicken, including some green peppers and onions. Serve the shrimp skewer on a bed of romaine lettuce with a fat-free Caesar dressing. Try a chicken wrap with grilled chicken and on- ions, cooked with a brush of olive oil, wrapped in a large crisp lettuce leaf. Throw on a few walnuts for crunch. Fire up the grill! Finally, ChooseMyPlate includes a glass of milk — a reminder to include milk and milk products in our chil- dren’s diet. Dairy foods such as low-fat milk, cottage cheese and yogurt are excellent choices. These dairy products are important sources of calcium and vitamin D. Children between 12 and 24 months of age should drink whole milk. Children older than two years of


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