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Administration (FDA), about 35 percent of 17-year-old girls use tanning machines. T e younger an adolescent is when begin- ning indoor tanning, the more rapidly the risk increases for the development of skin cancer in the future. T e FDA has also noted a 75-percent greater risk of melanoma if indoor tanning began prior to the age of 35. T e 2009 International Agency for


Research on Cancer (IARC) and the FDA have recommended banning com- mercial indoor tanning for those under age 18 to protect them from the in- creased risk for melanoma and other skin cancers. California has already put this into law, but not all states have formu- lated the same regulations for underage tanners. T e IARC found evidence of an association between indoor tanning and skin and eye cancer, squamous cell carcinoma and melanoma. Many tanning companies advertise that exposure to UV light in their beds will enhance the body’s vitamin D pro- duction and improve the immune system. However, there are safer ways to get vita- min D — including eating healthy foods and taking Vitamin D supplements. Alternatives to tanning beds include self-tanning creams and lotions, which are easily available, and spray tanning. Spray tanning is found at most tanning salons without posing any risk for skin damage. In addition, drug and department stores carry dusting powders that give a tanned appearance. For teens with a family histo- ry of melanoma, it is imperative to avoid exposure and instead use such alternatives.


Ready, Set, Grow


Safe Spa? A report released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) showed that of the 5,000 spas inspected within the last fi ve years, 57 percent breached at least one safety violation. Poor water quality was the most common. All salons are to use EPA-registered bacteri- cidal, fungicidal and virucidal disinfec-


With increased sun and skin exposure this season, it’s important to educate your kids about skin cancer


tants for items coming into contact with clients’ skin or hair. T ey should be visible to customers and available upon request. Before entering a spa facility for any


nail treatment, you need to manage your teen’s existing skin conditions, includ- ing eczema, psoriasis, even arthritis or diabetes. One or more open areas of skin can create a portal for infection. Take extra precautions when receiving


foot treatments. Any break in the skin, which can be caused by aggressive trimming


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