This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
campaign, ahead of and during, the UK’s Olympic year will have no doubt laid some important groundwork – from which all UK visitor attractions and locations can hope to benefi t. But fears have also been expressed over whether customer service can match the expectations of fi rst-time visitors, especially those who have already experienced the type of service standards found in North America and the Far East. Addressing the issue of Britain’s


perceived ‘unfriendliness’, chief executive of VisitBritain, Sandie Dawe, told Leisure Management (Q1 12): “While we’ve got up to four billion people watching on tv, we have the opportunity to change that image. We need to ensure the welcome, service and friendliness shine through.”


TOURISM RESPONSE VisitBritain has been encouraging the industry to improve its service offer in the run up to London 2012, by taking advantage of offi cial training programmes, such as World Host and Welcome to Excellence. Foy adds: “Working with London 2012, we’ve produced www. tourism2012Games.org as the offi cial source of information for the UK’s tourism industry. Attractions are encouraged to check out the site in the lead up to the Games for advice on matters such as brand protection, reaching international media, and case studies on how destinations around the UK are making the most of the opportunity.” The Paralympics will also put a spotlight


on the facilities for disabled visitors to the UK. It presents a key opportunity to


The Cultural Olympiad and London 2012 Festival


The Cultural Olympiad (CO) was created in 2008 for people across the host country to participate in arts, cultural, sporting and educational events. Around 16 million people are said to have participated in, or attended, CO events


and projects since its inception, with the highlight due to be the 12-week nationwide London 2012 Festival, which starts on Midsummer’s Day on 21 June and runs until the 9 September 2012.


Highlights include: A major new art installation along the 84-miles of Hadrian’s Wall;


Stonehenge being transformed into a glowing fairy tale scene with an elemental Fire Garden; the fi nal part of the National Portrait Gallery’s three-year photographic project documenting athletes and those working behind the scenes to make 2012 happen (see box out below); and The Stories of the World project, which involves 60 museums.


“THEY’LL BE AROUND 20,000 INTERNATIONAL JOURNALISTS COVERING THE GAMES. CAN WE GET THEM TO WRITE ARTICLES ABOUT UK ATTRACTIONS?“


reassess disabled access and how staff are trained to deal with disabled visitors.


SCEPTICISM However, while London 2012 and its related events have undoubtedly stimulated improvements, as well as the potential to raise the longer term profi le of the UK in the eyes of a global audience, there are professionals who remain sceptical about that translating into any real benefi ts to attractions and leisure businesses around the country.


“There’s too much hype surrounding the


Olympic benefi ts, and the reality for most UK visitor attractions is that the Games will simply have no relevance at all,” says chair of the Visitor Attractions Group and advisor on tourism policy, Ken Robinson. “In the initial aftermath there will be


feelings of pride, followed by a few months of defl ation – like when all the guests have left the party and there’s only the clearing up to do. After that, it’s the role of government to build on the legacy – attractions can only play a passive role. What I would say to sites during this Olympic year, is to just concentrate on running your business well – be here, be good, and be excellent at all times.” Global media attention started ahead of


the Royal Wedding last April. London 2012 and the Queen’s Jubilee (see p70) look set to build that attention to a crescendo, and the future holds even more opportunities – namely the Commonwealth Games in 2014 and the Rugby World Cup in 2015.


Sebastian Coe by Emma Hardy AM 2 2012 ©cybertrek 2012


Paralympic champion Eleanor Simmonds by Finlay MacKay Read Attractions Management online attractionsmanagement.com/digital 73


© Anderson & Low - National Portrait Gallery/BT Road to 2012 project


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86