This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
ATTRACTIONS MANAGEMENT


Kevin Murphy “W


hile many of the tech- niques we use today were in existence years ago, techno- logical advances have


made things easier and now the use of technology is the norm. This has good points and bad points. When we had to struggle with simpler tools, more care went into design and content, and with high costs, more due diligence was applied when using any technologies at all. Nowadays, as there’s so much available to use, anyone can have a go and I feel that the advance in displays and interactive technologies have intro- duced more mediocre content and also technology for technology’s sake. Another change is that the entertain- ment, themed and education sectors


are much more closely linked. Now organisations and conferences cross the sectors and professions, bring- ing in operators, architects, designers, integrators, project managers and all the various suppliers and disciplines needed to make a project happen. It feels more of a cohesive industry than it did years ago, yet there’s still room for improvement. Ask anyone in our industry to describe what our indus- try is, and you will get many different answers, but the changes in perception and practice are actually quite tangible.


UNWELCOME ADDITIONS I’m not keen on the commercialisation of glasses-based 3D. I really liked some of the 3D shows that were around 15 or more years ago – they were spe- cial. I have yet to see a commercial 3D release in the cinema that moves me as much as a really good story told in


It’s a more cohesive industry now, yet there’s room for improvement. Ask anyone to describe what our industry is and you’ll get many different answers


Murphy joined the attractions industry in 1977


plain old 2D. I even wonder if we’re still going through another 3D phase, as there have been some before over the years which then resulted in a loss of interest by the public, although we can see a high penetration into the home now which could keep it alive. Augmented reality was also intro-


duced way too soon. While there are now a few applications that are worth a look, many applications were lame and uninspiring. Possibly with the advances in technology and displays, in 10 years’ time AR can really take off and inspire uses that benefi t and entertain to a much higher degree,


EXCITING DEVELOPMENTS The most exciting development has been the immersive experience. I like taking large numbers of visitors on a journey in a group. There’s still room for the singular experience, but I feel strongly that people enjoy being with others and having an experience fed to them, with a strong storyline and series of sensory stimulations, particu- larly visual and aural. With dramatic changes in projection


technology, lens design, and now LED technology, the last 10 years has seen astonishing developments in what we can do both to and for the visitor. For the next 15 years, the most


Event’s designs for travel museum Riverside, Glasgow include a velodrome displaying 30 bicycles AM 2 2012 ©cybertrek 2012


radical change will still be linked to technology in some way, with the basic concepts and commercial realities offering the same sets of issues, oppor- tunities and upsets over the years. Not all the changes will be good, but advances in projection and LEDs will ensure that digital immersive spaces on a large scale will be explored even more across the sectors, taking visitors to places they can only imagine.” ●


Read Attractions Management online attractionsmanagement.com/digital 29


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86