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JUBILEE


DIAMOND OPPORTUNITY


As the Queen celebrates 60 years on the throne with a line-up of offi cial events this summer, we ask what UK attractions can do to appeal to the Jubilee crowds


JULIE CRAMER • JOURNALIST • ATTRACTIONS MANAGEMENT


Diamond Jubilee events – celebrating the British monarch’s 60-year reign – runs from Saturday 2nd June to Tuesday 5th June, and will be swiftly followed in July by six weeks of sporting heroics as the Olympics and Paralympics get into full swing. While billions of people around the


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world are expected to watch both events on tv, there’s a sense that the Jubilee celebrations will be much more of a home-spun affair, creating a chance for communities to engage with each other. One event that aims to build on this community spirit is The Big Lunch – an idea started by the Eden Project in Cornwall four years ago – which aims to get as many people in the UK together to have lunch with their community on the fi rst Sunday of June each year. This year coincides with the extended Jubilee


Visitor attractions can take advantage of the long weekend and community spirit


or sport-lovers and royalists the world over, summer 2012 in the UK promises to be an exciting time. The extended weekend of the Queen’s


people and a spokesperson says this year’s event is hoping to double that. As with Prince William and Kate


The Queen – 60 years on the throne


weekend, and Buckingham Palace has embraced The Big Jubilee Lunch as part of its main events.


STREET-WISE While most of these events will be in the form of self-organised street parties, the advantages of having so many people ‘out on the streets’, could present nearby visitor attractions with the opportunity to market their offers to a willing audience. Last year’s Big Lunch attracted two million


Middleton’s wedding in 2011, businesses should also benefi t from the extra Bank Holiday in 2012, falling on Tuesday 5th June, enabling families to enjoy an extra day out or, with a four-day weekend, take an extended UK break. According to the UK’s Department of Culture, Media and Sport, there will be “tangible and intangible” benefi ts associated with the additional public holiday, including “lifting national spirit, pride, tourism and trade”. UK attractions wanting to create


new product lines can capitalise on the Diamond Jubilee. The use of Royal Insignia and photographs on souvenirs is usually subject to strict controls under the Trade Marks Act 1994, but these rules have been temporarily relaxed for the Diamond Jubilee, allowing greater scope for them to be used on certain products. In addition, a special emblem has been designed, which is free to download (details are available on the British Monarchy website), for all activities linked to the Diamond Jubilee, such as local and national events, publications, retail and merchandising.


HOME PRIDE There’s a sense that some UK visitor sites are using the Diamond Jubilee year to re-assess their core values, Britishness and unique heritage. The National Trust’s head of publish- ing, John Stachiewicz (also chair of the Association for Cultural Enterprises), says:


“The Jubilee will attract proportionally more visitors to the UK from the Commonwealth, North America and Continental Europe, but at the National Trust (NT) our depend- ence on overseas visitors is very low – about 8 -10 per cent – and we’re not expecting a signifi cant change in that in 2012.” The organisation, which looks after


70 Read Attractions Management online attractionsmanagement.com/digital AM 2 2012 ©cybertrek 2012


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