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26/ JUNE 2010 THE RIDER INSIDE


Quarter Horse Guide to WEG............................26 Canadian Horse Racing Hall Of Fame...............26 OQHA News......................................................27 EOQHA News ...................................................28 AREA 3 News....................................................29 QROOI News.....................................................30 America’s Horse In Art......................................31


The Canadian Quarter Horse Association is an affiliate of the AQHA. Annual membership is free to current members of AQHA. To enroll on-line, visit the CQHA web site: www.cqha.ca, and choose


“Membership” section. Choose “Affiliates” to link to provincial Quarter Horse & Racing Association sites. Contact: Marnie Somers, President (204) 834-2479 or email: marnie@horsescoops.com


A Quarter Horse Lover’s Guide to the 2010 Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games


America’s Horse, May 25, 2010 - The world is coming to Lex- ington, Kentucky, this fall -the Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games, that is, along with all the fanfare that accompanies the year’s largest single sporting event in the United States. And the even cooler thing? AQHA and American Quarter Horses are front and center on this world stage.


It’s an incredible chance for AQHA to let a larger audi- ence see - by watching and rid- ing - just how athletic and ver- satile our breed is.


art intensive care unit and a surgery set-up.


AQHA is the official breed sponsor of reining, one of the eight international disci- plines spotlighted at the games, September 25-October 10. But even if you’re not a competitor or a diehard reining fan, you can still appreciate the World’s Fair atmosphere that surrounds the games. Its Equine Village will include nearly 150 educational booths and demonstrations by top-notch clinicians, equine entertainers, breed organizations and more. Its trade show will offer not-to-be-missed shop- ping, and there will be amazing options for wining and dining. In an area just inside the main entry, AQHA and alliance partner the National Reining Horse Association will offer test rides on American Quarter Horses to WEG spectators. For those who have some riding experience, there will also be a chance to “Ride a Reiner,” to experience a dizzying spin or even a sliding stop on a well- trained reining horse.


The rides will be conduct- ed inside the John Deere Demo Arena, an MD Barns open-sided barn that will be constructed on what is now a parking lot at the Kentucky Horse Park. The arena base and special reining surface will be brought in by Kiser Arena Specialists and main- tained by John Deere tractors and Kiser drags.


Within the Equine Vil- lage, AQHA pros will also have a strong presence. This is by no means an exhaustive list - because, really, everything about WEG is too big to encap- sulate in a short article. But expect to see Lynn Palm, Richard Shrake, Clinton Ander- son and Craig Cameron. And, a few more:


The John Deere Demo Arena will also play host to demonstrations from AQHA and NRHA professionals on world-caliber reining horses - as well as American Quarter Horse riders from other disciplines. Nearby, John Deere - an AQHA corporate partner and gold-level sponsor of the All- tech FEI World Equestrian Games - will have a large dis- play of its green machines. The National Cutting Horse Associa- tion, an AQHA alliance partner, will bring out its mechanical horse and cow, so spectators can experience the thrill of riding a ducking-and-diving cutting horse. Another fun stop will be the booth of Lexington’s Rood & Riddle Equine Hospital, where the official veterinarians of the games will offer daily educational lectures and a repli- ca of the hospital’s state-of-the-


AQHA Professional Horsewoman and America’s Horse columnist Stacy Westfall will take a place of honor in the opening ceremonies of WEG, riding a freestyle reining run bareback and bridleless aboard the superstar Whizards Baby Doll, aka “Roxy.”


Freestyle reining is a choreographed set of reining maneuvers set to music.


AQHA Professional Horse- men Bob Jeffreys and Suzanne Sheppard (featured in the “Is It My Horse or Is It Me” series of stories in America’s Horse) will be in the village September 29 - October 2.


ist and individual bronze medal- ist in the 2006 World Equestrian Games, has opted to sit out this year’s games as a competitor. But he’ll be on hand, offering clinics in the Equine Village September 25-28 and will per- form a freestyle reining demon- stration. He won’t say yet what he has planned for the demo, but he knows that with the world watching, “it’ going to need to be substantial.” He’ also have cameras in tow for his show on RFD-TV, “The Ride.”


So, How Do I Go?


AQHA makes it easy for you to purchase competition tickets by visiting www.aqha.com/WEG. Each competition is ticketed separate- ly, and this site will let you know which ones still have seats available.


AQHA Professional Horsewoman and Certified Horsemanship Association spokeswoman Julie Goodnight will teach clinics September 25- 27 on common equitation errors and their solutions, for both English and western riders. Aaron Ralston, the United States’ reining team gold medal-


A grounds pass is another, very affordable, option. With a grounds pass, you can gain access to the grounds of the All- tech FEI World Equestrian Games, including the Equine Village, an interactive chil- dren’s area, the trade show, a Kentucky Experience that offers a virtual tour of the Bluegrass State, and more. Ground passes are $20 each until May 31. The cost increases to $25 after May 31. Children 12 and under are allowed entrance to the grounds without charge, when accompa- nied by a paying adult. The


grounds passes do not allow entrance to competition venues. Buy your grounds passes at www.alltechfeigames.com/tick- ets.


With the huge influx of people expected, parking is another thing to consider, as are accommodations. Details about these and other spectator con- cerns are available at www.all- techfeigames.com/content.aspx? id=3102.


reining event in Oklahoma City. Stay tuned to www.aqha.com to see who will be representing the red, white and blue. Visit www.battleinthesaddle.com to learn more about the competi- tions taking place during the event and to purchase tickets to watch the world-class reiners compete to earn a spot a on the Adequan United States reining team.


Visit www.alltech- feigames.com and www.discov- erhorses.com to learn more about the games’ inaugural appearance in the United States, the disciplines that will be rep- resented there and much more.


Eight Is Enough


The eight disciplines of the Alltech FEI World Equestri- an Games are:


Reining Dressage


Para dressage Jumping Eventing Vaulting


WEG on NBC


The Adequan United States reining team has not yet been selected. The team selec- tion trials, as well as the United States Equestrian Federation National Open Reining Champi- onship will be July 10 as part of the Battle in the Saddle special


Combined driving Endurance


In addition to the 600,000 spectators expected on-site at the World Equestrian Games, millions more will have the opportunity to watch on NBC Sports, as the network provides an unprecedented six and a half hours of coverage over three Sundays. It’s the “largest major network broadcast of equestrian sport in U.S. television history,” NBC said in a press release. Be watching September 26 at 12 p.m. Eastern, October 3 at 1 p.m. Eastern (immediately following live coverage of the Ryder Cup golf tournament) and October 10 at 4 p.m. Eastern. AQHA news and infor- mation is a service of AQHA publications. For more informa- tion on The American Quarter Horse Journal, The American Quarter Horse Racing Journal or America’s Horse, visit www.aqha.com/magazines.


Canadian Horse Racing Hall of Fame Announces 2010 Inductees


The Canadian Horse Racing Hall of Fame today announced its 2010 inductees including six horses and four people. The Thoroughbred class of 2010 is headlined by Belmont Stakes’ winner Victory Gallop, along with Lady Angela, one of the most influential dams in breeding history, and multiple stakes winner Victorian Era in the Vet- erans category. They join Builder Mel Lawson and West Coast trainer/jockey Frank Barroby. The Standardbred inductees include Mister Big, the second richest pacer ever. He is joined in the HOF by the outstanding broodmare Classic Wish along with trainer Robert McIntosh, builder Peter Heffering and A Worthy Lad in the Veterans cat- egory.


Victory Gallop was bred by Toronto’s Ivan Dalos of Tall Oaks Farm and foaled at Joanne Clayton’s Darrowby Farm in Loretto, Ont. The bay colt by Cryptoclearance-Victorious Lil, by Vice Regent, never raced in Canada. He was sold for $25,000 at the fall yearling sales in Kentucky. Winner of two minor stakes races at two and a second-place finish in the Laurel Futurity, the colt blossomed after being acquired by Preston- wood Farm. Trained by Elliott Walden, Victory Gallop won the Rebel Stakes and the Arkansas Derby before second place finishes in the Ken- tucky Derby and Preakness. Victory Gallop then thwarted Real Quiet’s bid to become the first winner of the Triple Crown in 20 years with a nose victory at Belmont. The colt was a stakes winner for owners Jack, Art and J.R. Preston in


been one of the most consistent and successful performers in the sport. With career earnings of over $4 million, he is the second richest pacer of all time. This multiple Dan Patch and Nova Award winner won all the major races in his divi- sion as a five- year-old and paced 18 miles in 1:49 or lower. From 85 career starts, he has 34 wins, 20 seconds and 11 thirds. He is owned by Joseph Muscara of Huntingdon Valley, PA, and is standing his first season as a stallion at Tara Hills Farm in Port Perry, ON.


1999 and won an Eclipse Award as the Champi- on Older Male Horse.


Lady Angela’s effect on the breeding histo- ry throughout the world was firmly established when the daughter of Hyperion foaled a colt by Nearco. His name was Nearctic, the sire of Northern Dancer, whose offspring would domi- nate breeding and make E.P. Taylor and Wind- fields Farm the leading global breeders of stakes winners. Northern Dancer’s prolific sons include Danzig, Nijinsky II, Storm Bird, Sadler’s Wells and Vice Regent.


Victorian Era dominated stakes racing in Ontario in the 1960s for owner Allen Case and HOF trainer Louis Cavalaris Jr. The son of Victo- ria Park won eighteen stakes races, was Horse of the Year, a three-time champion, and unfortu- nately ineligible to run in the 1965 Queen’s Plate


when an eligibility payment was not made when he was two.


Mel Lawson, 87, of Hamilton and Jim Dandy Stables were involved in the breeding and racing of quality horses for almost fifty years. His Sovereign Award winners were Eternal Search, who won the award three times, Let’s Go Blue and Ginger Gold. His horses have won 46 stakes races. The 66-year-old Barroby dominated racing on the prairie racing circuit as a jockey, winning titles in Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta and B.C., and was second in Canada in 1965. Three times he was the leading trainer at Hastings Park in Vancouver. He is the first B.C.-based trainer to be elected to Canada’s HOF. Barroby was elect- ed to the B.C. Thoroughbred Hall of Fame in 2009.


Mister Big, a son of Grinfromeartoear, has


Classic Wish, a daughter of Armbro Emer- son, won over $436,000 during her racing career and has excelled as a broodmare. From 11 foals, she has produced two millionaires including Bet- tors Delight, a winner of over $2 million and No Pan Intended, a winner of $1.6 million. Her average earnings per foal are in excess of $608,000. Bred by David Lemon of Komoka, Ont., Classic Wish is now owned by Winbak Farm of Chesapeake City, MD.


Robert McIntosh, of Windsor, Ont., is a four-time O’Brien winner as Canada’s Trainer of the Year and is the leading trainer in the Breeders Crown with 15 championship trophies to his credit. He has trained over 3,562 winners and horses to earnings in excess of $78 million. Among the lengthy list of champions that McIn- tosh has trained over the years are North Ameri- can Horse of the Year champions Staying


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