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WHO, WHAT, WHEN


INTERGENERATIONAL HARMONY? Who are these students, and who is the older alumna with them? Can you spot the young professor as well? Tell us your answers at 518-580-5747, srosenbe@skidmore.edu, or Scope c/o Skidmore College. We’ll report answers, and run a new quiz, in the upcoming Scope magazine.


FROM LAST TIME


Man of the hour? Stacy Cunningham ’89 thinks she might see herself “way, way in the back” and guesses the speaker was renowned playwright Arthur Miller, whose campus visit she re- members well. In fact the huge crowds were probably similar, but this event occurred a few years later.


Jesus Navarro ’97 was the first to identify former New York Governor Mario Cuomo as the speaker. He hazards that it was a speech at SUNY-Albany, but in fact it was Skid- more’s main gymnasium that Cuomo filled to bursting. Navarro recog- nizes Wendy Wilson ’96 as the student in the center taking notes. As Wilson recalls, she was interviewing Cuomo for an article—after being a Skidmore News staffer, she was an intern for the Sara togian newspaper. Skidmore library re-


tiree Mary O’Donnell offers another ID: she thinks she sees, near the top-right corner, art professor Trish Lyell ’81. Tamara Gorovatskaya Rubakha ’96 IDs not just Cuomo and


Wilson but also Dave Maswary ’96, near the center. Those and more student names come to mind for Eric Goss ’96, who recog- nizes Fritz Musser ’97 and Larry Jackson ’99 as well. Rubakha adds, “I recall that Mr. Cuomo was a great speaker, and that Democratic leaders were always hugely popular on campus.” Everyone’s guess


about the era is right: the event was the spring-se- mester opening Convo- cation in January 1996. Cuomo had been defeat- ed for a fourth term as governor in 1994 but re- mained a highly sought- after orator on the lec- ture circuit. —SR


64 SCOPE FALL 2014


BOB MAYETTE


MARK MCCARTY


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