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“Living today for what it will mean tomorrow”


BY HELEN EDELMAN ’74


People and planet, ethics and economics are what define sustainability in the 21st century. A decade ago, turning down the thermostat, recycling paper, and carpooling were considered sustainability efforts. Today at Skidmore they include a community garden, composting, a free bike-sharing program, dialogues exploring how food secu- rity relates to social justice and diversity, and many other initiatives that benefit the campus and region and prepare students to become global citizens with the knowledge and passion to protect the world that is both their inheritance and their legacy. Levi Rogers and Rachel


Willis are the college’s sustain- ability coordinators, charged with guiding campus activities that align with goal 3 of Skid- more’s strategic plan, spear- headed by President Philip Glotzbach. That goal includes: “Make the Skidmore campus an environmental laboratory, increase our emphasis on re- sponsible planning for envi- ronmentally sustainable opera- tion, and continue efforts to


LEVI ROGERS AND RACHEL WILLIS


reduce the College’s ‘environ- mental footprint.’” In serving that mission, they’re also steer- ing students into experiential learning, job-skills develop- ment, and opportunities to put their values into action. Some projects were initially made possible by a major grant from the Margaret A. Cargill Foundation. And a fund is available to help students, staff, and faculty implement their own initiatives in sustainability.


16 SCOPE FALL 2014


RILEY NEUGEBAUER


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