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At 102 years old, Helen Miller Hobbs is a senior member of


Skidmore’s Century Club, for alumnae who have celebrated their 100th birth- days. Helen received a certificate from President Philip Glotzbach to honor this milestone and her connection to Skidmore history. Her son, Skip, observes, “Mother is quite healthy, has most of her ‘marbles,’ and looks forward to the six o’clock evening news and a glass of wine every day.” ALUMNI AFFAIRS OFFICE SKIDMORE COLLEGE 815 N. BROADWAY SARATOGA SPRINGS, NY 12866


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A NOTE ABOUT CLASS NOTES


If your class is not listed, please send your class notes to the Alumni Affairs Office, Skidmore College, 815 North Broadway, Saratoga Springs, NY 12866-1632.


Class notes are also posted on Skidmore’s public Web site: skidmore.edu/scope.


Marxie Squarcia Hesler turned


101 on May 31. According to daugh- ter Marcia, Marxie enjoys life at Lakeview Village in Lenexa, Kan. The daughter of Italian


N MAY 28–31


immigrants, she was the first college graduate in her family. Marxie still shares tales of her Skidmore years with her three daughters, nine grandchildren, and 15 great-grands. An inaugural member of Skidmore’s Century Club, she was delighted to receive a certificate from President Glotzbach. ALUMNI AFFAIRS OFFICE SKIDMORE COLLEGE 815 N. BROADWAY SARATOGA SPRINGS, NY 12866


Connie Messler Sharman cele- brated her 100th birthday on April 22 with four parties, including a special fete thrown by her local chapter of Save the Children, the charity she has served for 50 years. A longtime resident of Leamington Spa, England, and a for- mer colleague of nuclear scientist Robert Oppenheimer, Connie attended her 70th reunion accompanied by 12 family mem- bers, including greatniece Judy Lutz ’05, in 2007. Even at 98, she was driving around town on a scooter sporting a Creative Thought Matters sticker given to


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her by good friend and London resident Peggy Holden Briggs ’84. Connie remains an active volunteer for the United Nations Association and One World Link. She was thrilled to receive a certificate from President Glotzbach saluting her as an inaugural member of Skidmore’s Century Club. ALUMNI AFFAIRS OFFICE SKIDMORE COLLEGE 815 N. BROADWAY SARATOGA SPRINGS, NY 12866


Jean Brickwood Slocum lives with her daughter in Boothbay, Maine. She has six grandchildren. Still active, she drives Boothbay Harbor and to Woodbridge, Conn., to see her son and great-grands. Jean enjoys knitting and reading.


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Marjorie Scott Ott says, “All is as well as can be at 92!” She lives with her three sons, two dogs, and a parrot in a condo in Delray Beach, Fla. Edith Hallock Reagan’s three grand- daughters and seven great-grandkids help keep her busy. She has wonderful memo- ries of Skidmore. Nancy Jack Bell likes living in her retirement community in Carlsbad, Calif. She exercises and swims daily and enjoys lots of entertaining activities year round. Ellie Sloss Schatz is finally a great- grandmother: granddaughter Samantha welcomed a son last year. Ellie’s five other grands are gainfully employed but still unmarried. Husband Jim died last July and her life has changed as a result, though she continues to be a “lousy golfer” and intrepid traveler. She went to Vancouver, B.C., to visit a daughter and her family and then to their second home on the Hawaiian island of Kauai last October. She sees Lila Baruth Pelton now and then.


Helen Rickenback Scott is “moving


very slowly these days.” She is happy to see Ruth Benson Day ’43 at her fitness class twice a week. Helen’s daughter Alexandra and grandson Ethan, 16, live in Palo Alto, Calif., and she sees them twice a year. Son Jonathan lives nearby in New Britain, Conn. Helen, who loves


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