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CREATIVE THOUGHT Animal instincts


ogist, he works at two animal hospitals in New Jersey (where he sees plenty of cat days too). As a teenager, Glasser volunteered at a local humane society and knew, heading to Skidmore, that he wanted to pursue veterinary medicine. As a double major in geology and chemistry, he worked at a vet clinic near campus, and after graduation he enrolled at Tufts University. Working with oncology technicians at Tufts,


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Glasser took satisfaction from seeing owners happy with how their animals responded to therapy. He was also impressed by the bond that developed between oncologists and families. At Animal Emergency and Referral Associates in Fairfield and AnimERge in Raritan, Glasser’s patients are mainly dogs and cats,


mostly treated as outpatients. Ninety percent are referrals from local general practitioners and arrive at Glasser’s office after being diag- nosed with a malignancy. Although trained to treat animals, Glasser also spends considerable time coaching fami- lies, “especially as pets start to become resist- ant to treatment,” he says. He’s also up-front about the potentially high costs of cancer care. He’s seen clients “who can barely rub two pen- nies together but spend thousands of dollars on therapy—and the opposite: those who can afford it and do nothing.” Guiding his practice is a simple philosophy:


“Animals just want to feel good, and if we’re not improving their quality of life, then we change protocols, stop therapy, or consider euthanasia.” Glasser advises clients that “a survival time of one year after a diagnosis” is realistic for a pet that would typically live 12 to 14 years. Glasser’s own furry family members include


10-year-old TC, a golden retriever diagnosed with a rare cancer of the adrenal gland. After surgery, he started TC on a new medication. It’s been four years, he’s had no side effects, and he’s doing well. Even the scientist admits, “To me it’s a miracle!” —MTS


56 SCOPE FALL 2014


ou won’t catch Seth Glasser ’02 complain- ing about the dog days. A veterinary oncol-


Becky Pollock Lunde and husband Kevin welcomed a daughter, Avery, on March 26. She joins big brother Anders, 3. Becky and family have been in the San Francisco Bay area for nine years. She works for NOAA’s National Ocean Services.


My husband, Roy Geiser ’98, and I spent reunion weekend preparing for the birth of our son, William Magnus, who arrived on June 1. While many of you were toasting your college years at Gaffney’s, we were bringing a potential legacy for the class of 2036 into the world! NANCY MAGNUS 9300 PRETORIA PLACE DULLES, VA 20189-9300 MAGNUSNANCY@GMAIL.COM


Afghanistan, Nabila Alibhai has returned to the US as a fellow in MIT’s Special Program for Urban and Regional Studies. She previously held


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After more than four years in


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positions at the Aga Khan Development Network, the UN, and the International Organization for Migration. She has worked with governments and multilater- al organizations in Afghanistan, Pakistan, Kenya, Tanzania, and elsewhere to devel- op policies and programs that address rural development, public health, and emergency preparedness. Nabila holds a master’s in public health from Yale. LAUREN GRANAHAN 514 BERRY CHASE WAY CARY, NC 27519-6497 RHUBS5@HOTMAIL.COM


Robert Ingenito married Kim Thornton on May 17 in New Milford, Conn. The wedding took place on a beautiful day at the Chapel of Our Lady at the Canterbury School, and a reception was held at the Candlewood Inn in nearby Brookfield. Noah Opitz and Lester Ramdawar served as grooms- men. JANINE GELLER JONES 7 GEORGE ST. STONEHAM, MA 02180-3906 JRGELLER@HOTMAIL.COM


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Tessa on August 17, 2013. Kate quit her job as associate director of low-threshold hous- ing at the Pine Street Inn to stay home


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Kate O’Rourke Stormand hus- band Erik welcomed daughter


with Tessa. Erik’s job took the family to Sweden for three months, enabling Kate and Erik to experience new parenthood abroad. Although it was “a blast,” they are happy to be back home. Kate and Erik saw a bunch of Skiddies at Andy Moeller’s wedding on May 10, including Kevin Shenoy ’00, Dan Vogelzang, Dan Osman, Pat Rafferty, and Micah Flynn ’03. Hannah Liverant Close, husband Joshua, and daughter Emmeline were thrilled to welcome Theodore Nathan into the family on April 8. Hannah reports that little Theo is one of the hap- piest babies ever, and his big sister dotes on him.


Libby Cox and Edward welcomed twin boys, Lyon and Oliver, on April 11. Libby and Ed are taking a break from interna- tional traveling as yoga teachers to be homebodies for a couple of years. They live in Austin, Texas. Eli Zimmer and Sugey Guridy Zimmer love being parents to Josh and Lanna. Eli is a partner at an insurance firm and Sugey is a marketing executive recruiter. If parenting and work weren’t keeping them busy enough, they’re also renovating their house in Westport, Conn. Megan Coleman McElwain and hus- band Gabriel welcomed son Charles Alexis on April 9. KATE NEDELMAN HERBST 35 HOLLINGSWORTH AVE. BRAINTREE, MA 02184-5518 781-843-5140 KATEHERBST@GMAIL.COM


Alexis Parker and Ben Kasdon welcomed their first child, son Parker Zale, in August 2013. Parker enjoys eating, relaxing in hammocks, laughing at his pug brother McGuyver, listening to music, and otherwise living the dream. Julia Paparelli and husband Zachary welcomed son Charles Edward on Feb 11. Jude Mooney Fricano was recently pro- moted to manager of the customer-care center at State Farm Insurance and relo- cated from Bloomington, Ill., to Dallas. She, husband Bill, and 8-year-old daugh- ter Ellie look forward to adventuring in their hometown. Vera Ventura and husband Joe wel- comed baby Joseph Asher on September 17, 2013. Vera says, “He’s keeping us on our toes, and we are very grateful for this little gift we’ve been given.” Ken Pivor is the proud recipient of a Sports Emmy Award for his production work on the London Olympic Games. An industry veteran of over 10 years, he tran- sitioned from the Outdoor Life Network


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AT WORK


DENISE APPLEWHITE


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