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Many spaces will bring together students from a wide range of majors. It’s a big change, but this new vision has been enthusiasti- cally endorsed by Skidmore’s faculty. Biologist and neurosci- entist Jennifer Bonner looks forward to “localizing expertise around central facilities.” As one example, she says, “Bring- ing our various microscopes together means that both faculty and students will get exposure to micro - scopes and techniques that they weren’t familiar with before, and our micro scopy imaging specialist can help all of us more efficiently.” A researcher who uses fish eggs to study how alcohol affects neuron development, she says, “I’ll be in the biomolecular cluster—six profes- sors sharing one big research area, where


we’ll get to see our colleagues’ work and get new ideas for our own work.”


As for the health and exercise science department, now in


the Williamson Sports Center, Denise Smith says, “We might benefit the most, since we’ve been the farthest separated from our colleagues in other sciences.” In CIS, “I’ll share a biomolecular lab, for analyzing blood and tissue samples and other work, with biologists and chemists and neuroscien- tists. I’m looking forward to the shared energy of working


CIS | LEVEL 2: biomolecular and cell biology


Ancillary Course Work Projects


Shared Research Lab


Shared Autoclave


Student Space


Chem Prep Radiation Computational Develop mental Office Write-Up


Instrumentation Lab


Office Cold Room Cell Culture


Electro- physiology


Office


together. Co-locating all our physical and life sciences is a powerful signal of Skidmore’s commitment to integrated sci- ence education.”


“THE BOUNDARY BETWEEN TEACHING AND RESEARCH IS PERMEABLE, AND STUDENTS MUST BE ABLE TO WORK COLLABORATIVELY WITH EACH OTHER AND WITH FACULTY MEMBERS.”


Neuroscience currently has psychologists in Tisch Learn- ing Center and biologists in Dana Science Center. Hassan Lopez has thought about collaborations with certain col- leagues, but geographic distance has scotched those ideas. A scholar of hormone-mediated behavior in rats, he’ll be sharing the CIS’s com- mon vivarium of individually condi- tioned rooms for each group of ani- mals. And he says the plan for neuro- science to share an anatomy and physi- ology teaching lab with health and ex- ercise sciences “makes perfect sense and will promote cross-fertilization of


ideas.” HES major Timothy Brodsky ’14 says, “Our research team works in the Sports Center and in Dana. We spend quite a bit of time going back and forth to conduct various experiments. In the new building, the animal room and all necessary equipment and space will be in one place. That will encourage a better team dynamic for working together on projects.” Lopez’s student Madeline Pelz ’14 is doing her senior the- sis and would have loved to work in the CIS: “A lot of the





Office WINTER 2014 SCOPE 2 PRELIMINARY DESIGNS, SUBJECT TO CHANGE


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