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homes, cottages, and apartments sur- round a grand community clubhouse. Amenities include two restaurants, a bar, a pool, a croquet lawn, a wellness park, a woodworking shop, and golf privileges at eight premier courses. We are owned by St. Joseph of the Pines. (See ad on page 32.) PET FRIENDLY


Cypress Glen Retirement Community, 100 Hickory St., Greenville, NC 27858, (800) 669-2835, www.cypressglen.org Cypress Glen is an established CCRC of- fering independent-living apartments and cottages with on-site assisted living and skilled nursing and a dedicated memory- care cottage. Just minutes from East Caro- lina University, shopping, and restaurants, the community is situated on a beautiful, 95-acre natural setting. It also is close to five significant military installations, a VA regional medical center, and a new VA clinic in Greenville. Amenities include a flexible dining plan, weekly housekeeping, a new fitness center with a pool, and scheduled transportation. Choose from four entrance- fee plans, including a 90-percent-refund- able option. Entrance fees range from $18,228 to $239,506. PET FRIENDLY


Deerfield Episcopal Retirement Com- munity, 1617 Hendersonville Road, Asheville, NC 28803, (800) 284-1531, (828) 274-1531, www.deerfieldwnc.org On 125 acres just south of the Biltmore Estate, this full-service Life Care com- munity combines Asheville’s casually elegant style with state-of-the-art ame- nities. Deerfield offers spacious apart- ments and cottage homes, a health and wellness center, a spa, pottery and art studios, multiple dining venues, a cock- tail lounge, and an array of amenities and services. If a health care need arises, Deerfield offers assisted-living and skilled-nursing care in the on-site health care center. The community is nonsmok- ing. (See ad on page 66.) PET FRIENDLY


Scotia Village Retirement Commu- nity, 2200 Elm Ave., Laurinburg, NC 28352, (888) 726-8428, (910) 277- 2000, www.scotiavillage.org Scotia Village offers independent living on the same campus as assisted living and skilled nursing. All of the living options at Scotia Village have been designed for comfort and distinctive living. Residents enjoy a variety of residential floor plans and styles from which to choose. Our en- compass program encourages participants to find balance in the eight dimensions of wellness: nutritional, intellectual, physical, spiritual, social, environmental, community outreach, and safety. Incentives are avail- able for retired military personnel.


The Village at Brookwood, 1860 Brookwood Ave., Burlington, NC 27215, (800) 282-2053, www.villageatbrookwood.org Enjoy the lifestyle of a vital full-service, nonprofit CCRC in the heart of North Carolina, sponsored by Alamance Re- gional Medical Center, a part of the Cone Health. Two major interstate highways provide access to the Durham and Fort Bragg VA medical centers. The Village is midway between the Triangle and Triad and near two international airports, universities, and championship golf. An aquatic/wellness center with a salt-water pool adds to the amenities. Entrance fees start at $85,400, with garden homes, apartments, and refund options to choose from. Life Care and fee-for-ser- vice care are available. (See ad on page 103.) PET FRIENDLY


PENNSYLVANIA Bethany Village, 325 Wesley Drive, Me-


chanicsburg, PA 17055, (717) 766-0279, www.bethanyvillage.org Bethany Village is a not-for-profit re- tirement community with a focus on enhancing the vibrant and healthy life- styles today’s adults age 55 and older are


an entree, and a dessert. Restaurant- style and à la carte dining allow din- ers to order from a menu.


ENTRANCE FEES typically are paid in addition to monthly payments and are considered pay in advance for medical services a resident will receive.


EQUITY OWNERSHIP refers to the option in some communities to accu- mulate equity from the ownership of a residence or to purchase an equity- ownership share in the community that can be transferred to a resident’s estate or a qualified successor.


FEE-FOR-SERVICE CARE is an arrangement where health care pro- viders charge a fee for each individual service they provide (doctor’s visits, tests, surgery, etcetera). After the service has been provided, a health care provider submits an insurance claim to be reimbursed.


A GATED COMMUNITY is a group of homes that are protected by a closed perimeter of walls or fences. In addition to being closed off from outsiders, these communities usually feature additional security, such as guards, entry codes, and key cards. Gated communities generally offer residents amenities such as swim- ming pools, golf courses, restaurants, tennis courts, and exercise areas. Some gated communities are exclu- sively for senior residents.


A HEALTH CARE CENTER treats patients for minor medical issues or short-term illnesses. These centers typically provide services including cold, flu, and allergy treatments; ear, nose, and throat treatments; general checkups; gynecological services; lab work; and psychiatric care.


HOME HEALTH SERVICES allow patients to obtain the health care treatment they need while remaining in their homes — a good way to help patients retain their independence. Professionals who provide home health services include registered nurses, social workers, dietitians, speech pathologists, physical thera- pists, and home health aides. Home health services might be provided on a full-time or part-time basis.


INDEPENDENT LIVING refers to housing arrangements for those who are age 55 and older. Generally, inde- pendent-living facilities are for those who are still in good health and do not need much assistance with daily


Retirement Community Sourc e  MARCH 2014 MILITARY OFFICER 91


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