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www.indianrivercolonyclub.com We are an active, friendly, one-of-a-kind community offering manned security and unsurpassed maintenance-free living. Indian River Colony Club features two- to four-bedroom single-family homes, the At Ease Club, Colony Hall, and other premier amenities: an 18- hole, par-72 private golf course; tennis courts and a fitness center; a heated pool; RV and boat storage; and more than 50 clubs and activities. Patrick AFB, upscale shopping, and Space Coast beaches are only minutes away. The Orlando International Airport is just 45 minutes away. (See ad on page 84.) PET FRIENDLY


Lakes of Mount Dora, Pringle Home- building Group, 8124 Bridgeport Bay Circle, Mount Dora, FL 32757, (800) 325-4471, www.lakesofmountdora.com Near historic Mount Dora, Fla., this premier gated community features 178 acres of lakes and an 18,000-square- foot clubhouse with a pool, a fitness center, a library, billiards, and more. Pringle builds custom homes priced from the $190,000s to more than $450,000, with full architectural design and decor services. PET FRIENDLY


Shell Point Retirement Community, 15101 Shell Point Blvd., Fort Myers, FL 33908, (800) 780-1131, www.shellpoint.org Scores of military officers and veterans have chosen Florida’s largest life-care community, located on prime water- front property near Sanibel Island. This resort setting includes three existing neighborhoods plus a new development, The Estuary. Amenities include boat- ing, golf, dining, lifetime learning, travel, recreation, and comfortable residences plus superlative wellness programs and health care. (See ad on page 67.) PET FRIENDLY


Solivita, 395 Village Drive, Kissimmee, FL 34759, (877) 335-1543, www.avhomesinc.com Located in Kissimmee, Fla., Solivita is a spectacular lifestyle-rich community for those 55 and older. Mediterranean- inspired homes from 1,361 to more than 2,400 square feet are surrounded by 150,000 square feet of premier ame- nities, from golf, sports, and fitness to shopping, dining, and a vast array of resident clubs and activities. New homes range from the $150,000s to $400,000s. Request one of several brand-new floor plans. Ten new models now are open. (See ad on page 78.)


University Village, 12401 North 22nd St., Tampa, FL 33612, (800) 524-5020, (813) 975-5009, www.universityvillage.net As an exceptional CCRC in Florida, Uni- versity Village provides lifetime benefits for residents through The Shield. Univer- sity Village offers its residents spacious apartments and villa homes, resort-style amenities, and services with the peace of mind that comes from knowing you have planned well for the future. (See ad on page 105.) PET FRIENDLY


Westminster Communities of Florida, 80 West Lucerne Circle, Orlando, FL 32801, (800) 948-1881, www.westminsterretirement.com We’re your best choice for active living! Westminster Communities of Florida of- fers you choices in lifestyles — it’s up to you. You can choose to live on the water- front, nestled in gardens and woods, or in the heart of downtown. You’ll love the life at one of our communities in Bradenton, Jacksonville, Orlando, St. Petersburg, Tal- lahassee, or Winter Park, where we offer a full continuum of care if it ever should be needed. Customized pricing and special grants for former and retired servicemem- bers are available. (See ad on page 60.)


with daily activities such as groom- ing, getting dressed, bathing, using the restroom, and taking prescribed medications. Assisted-living facili- ties are not for those who need more complicated and extensive attention, e.g., full-time nursing care. Assisted living also has a social component, as residents can socialize during meal times and other activities without having to leave the facility.


CARF-CCAC ACCREDITATION is issued by the Continuing Care Ac- creditation Commission (CCAC), an organization that is part of the Com- mission on Accreditation of Rehabili- tation Facilities (CARF), to facilities that provide services for the aging. Facilities that are eligible to receive CARF-CCAC accreditation include as- sisted-living centers, continuing-care retirement communities, aging ser- vices networks, and nursing homes. To qualify for CARF-CCAC ac-


creditation, a health care facility must demonstrate it is committed to providing quality care to seniors. During the accreditation process, facility owners must fill out a survey, allow CARF-CCAC representatives to observe the operations of the facil- ity, and undergo an organizational review. In addition, the CARF-CCAC will interview a facility’s staff and pa- tients and the family members of pa- tients to determine the quality of care patients receive. CARF-CCAC makes its accreditation decisions based on the standards developed by a team of service providers, consumers, and policy makers. More than 6,000 fa- cilities are accredited by CARF-CCAC.


CCRCs, or continuing-care retire- ment communities, deliver several levels of care on one campus. These communities are made up of apart- ments that can be occupied by independent-living residents, as well as those who need assisted- living, skilled-nursing, or memory- care services.


THE CONTINUUM OF CARE is a philosophy that allows patients to re- ceive health care at different levels of intensity within a single community, typically a CCRC.


DINING OPTIONS often include a set number of meals a week prepared in on-campus restaurants, a cafete- ria, or a residence. Check with the community and current residents to see what is available. Fine dining gen- erally means meals will be served in courses with an appetizer or a salad,


Retirement Community Sourc e  MARCH 2014 MILITARY OFFICER 89


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