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rapidfire «NutritionNOTES» A Little CIA History


WITH DEER POPULATIONS TOO HIGH for the animals’ well-being and sport hunting popular in most parts of the country, venison appears on many Ameri- can dinner tables this time of year. Like other meats, venison can be cut into steaks or ground, making it an ideal addition to favorites like spaghetti and tacos. To tame the toughness of this lean meat, marinate


it overnight in an acid-based marinade such as wine, vinegar, or lemon juice, mixed with herbs and garlic. Using a slow cooker is another good approach. Remember to always cook wild game thoroughly and consume only healthy animals. The flavor of your meat will vary based on the animal’s diet. — Rear Adm. Joyce Johnson, USPHS (Ret), D.O., provides cooking tips and rec- ipes for barbecued venison, a venison pot roast, and more at www.moaa.org/ nutrition.


TRICAREUPDA+E


BENEFICIARIES ENROLLED IN TRICARE PRIME may receive clinical preventive services at no cost from their primary care manager or from any net- work provider without a referral or authorization. For those who use TRICARE Standard or Extra or are enrolled in TRICARE Reserve Select or TRICARE Retired Reserve, there are no cost shares for the fol- lowing clinical preventive services:  breast cancer screenings;  cervical cancer screenings;  colorectal cancer screenings;  prostate cancer screenings;  immunizations; and  well-child visits for children under age 6. For more information about TRICARE’s preventive care coverage, visitwww.tricare.mil/livewell/preventive.


A


rmy Brig. Gen. William J. Donovan’s


medals, a World War II- era Enigma machine, and Osama bin Laden’s assault rifle are among more than 17,000 other artifacts that make up the holdings of the CIA Museum at CIA headquarters in Langley, Va. It’s the most impres- sive museum the world will never see. Six galleries transport visitors through the agen- cy’s storied history, from the Office of Strategic Ser- vices (OSS) to modern-day war intelligence. The items were ac-


quired from OSS and CIA workers and their families; military personnel who participated in CIA opera- tions, such as the 2011 mis- sion to kill bin Laden; and private collections. “Sometimes our col- lection efforts are project-


driven,” museum director and curator Toni Hiley ob- serves. “When we decided to do an exhibit about the CIA’s involvement in Op- eration Enduring Freedom, we interviewed people who participated.” Among the items donated were a knife carried by Gary Schroen, who led the first CIA incur- sion into Afghanistan in 2001, and clothing worn by the former Army ranger who led the second team. The primary goal of the museum, notes Hiley, is to inform, educate, and inspire. All new CIA em- ployees take their oath of office in front of the agen- cy’s Memorial Wall, tour the museum on their first day, and receive additional lectures from the agency’s history staff. Take a virtual museum tour at https://www.cia .gov/about-cia/cia-museum. — Don Vaughan


28 MILITARY OFFICER MARCH 2014


PHOTOS: ABOVE, CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY; LEFT, SHUTTERSTOCK


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