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chaptersinaction Chapter Achievements


From the Field: Greater Rome-Utica (N.Y.) Chapter In December 2013, members of the Greater Rome-Utica Chapter (www.grucmoaa.org) coordinated an effort to place more than 800 wreaths on veterans’ graves as part of the national Wreaths Across America program, which honors veterans during wreath-laying ceremonies at cemeteries across the country. Mem- bers worked alongside other volun- teers to place the wreaths, sponsored by area businesses, at three nearby veterans’ cemeteries. According to Lt. Cmdr. Robert


Haley, USN (Ret), president of the Greater Rome-Utica Chapter, a third of the proceeds from wreath sales go to the chapter, which uses the funds to provide college schol- arships and assist the families of deployed servicemembers.


Aloha (Hawaii) Chapter Members of the Aloha Chapter (www.aloha-moaa.org) and its Mer- rie Ladies Club donated $250 in baby supplies to help young military families staying at Fisher House II near Tripler Army Medical Center (TAMC) in Honolulu. Chapter mem- bers support Fisher House, which provides low- or no-cost housing to military and veterans’ families while their loved ones are receiving treat- ment at a military medical facility. Members also provided 500 in-


spirational cards to TAMC patients. Sixty additional cards were given to hospice patients at Tripler’s VA Cen- ter for Aging during the chapter’s an- nual patriotic songfest.


Southeast Idaho Chapter Members of the Southeast Idaho Chapter (www.moaa.org/chapter/ id04) joined with leaders from


other military and veterans’ orga- nizations and local veterans service officers and staffed an information booth at the Eastern Idaho State Fair in Blackfoot. Visitors learned about local VA services and pro- grams and military and veterans’ organizations they were eligible to join. In addition, $500 in donations was collected for the Wounded Warriors Project. According to Southeast Idaho Chapter President Col. Richard Kearsley, USAF (Ret), the chapter used the opportunity to recruit seven new national MOAA members and four new chapter members.


Delaware Council of Chapters Members of the Delaware Council of Chapters (www.moaa.org/chap ter/delawarecouncil) spearheaded an effort to establish a trust fund that will provide emergency finan- cial assistance to veterans in the state. Their efforts paid off in 2013 when Gov. Jack Markell passed leg- islation establishing the Delaware Veterans Trust Fund, which will rely on individual and corporate donations nationwide. Council President Col. Ron Sarg,


(left) Despite 15 inches of snow, Greater Rome-Utica (N.Y.) Chapter board member Cmdr. Robert Piper, USN (Ret), takes part in Wreaths Across America during the 2013 holiday season. (above) Members of the Aloha (Hawaii) Chapter and its Merrie Ladies Club buy baby supplies to donate to Fisher House II at Tripler Army Medical Center in Honolulu.


46 MILITARY OFFICER MARCH 2014


USAF (Ret), serves on Delaware’s Commission of Veterans Affairs. Sarg worked closely with Lt. Cmdr. John Knotts, USN (Ret), executive director of the commission and a member of the Dover (Del.) Chapter (www.doverdemoaa.org), to ensure the bill’s passage.


MO


— Contributors are Col. Barry Wright, USA (Ret), director, Council and Chapter Affairs; Col. Brian Anderson, USAF (Ret), deputy director; and Kris Ann Hegle. For submission information, see page 6.


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