This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
washingtonscene


COLA Cuts Are Wrong Survey results show 95 percent of


respondents oppose the cut. M


ore than 16,000 respon- dents participated in MOAA’s online survey in mid-January to


COLA Cut Survey Results


What is your position on the COLA cut for retirees under the age of 62 included in the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2013?


Oppose Support Other 95% 3% 2%


measure reactions to the COLA-cutting provision in the recently passed Bipartisan Budget Act of 2013. In total, about 95 percent of respon- dents said they oppose the COLA cut. About 63 percent of those surveyed said they think the cuts break faith with those who have served. Another 32 percent think other federal spending programs should be targeted for cuts before mili- tary retirement. MOAA thinks the negative effect on the morale of the currently serving


force already is surfacing. A full repeal of the COLA cut is needed immediately to keep from breaking faith with those cur- rently serving and those who have served more than two decades in uniform.*


Recruiting I


Challenges Services outline future concerns.


n testimony before the House Armed Services Military Person- nel Subcommittee, Virginia Penrod, deputy assistant secretary of defense for military personnel policy, said, “While all the services, except the Army Reserve,


have met or exceeded recruiting goals to date, the department faces a number of significant obstacles in the years ahead.” The past several years have seen some of the best military recruits in history, as the civilian job market shrank in many places and the services established large, well-funded recruiting teams at the height of the Iraq War. But as the U.S. economy gets back on


track (unemployment recently fell below 7 percent for the first time in five years), DoD’s recruiting commands are bracing for potential challenges. “We recognize this trend will be un-


sustainable as the economy continues to improve and competition to draw recruits from a small, qualified talent pool, who are alarmingly less inclined to choose military service as a career, increases dramatically,” said Brig. Gen. Gina Grosso, Air Force director of force management policy. Grosso and other top Pentagon recruit- ing officials testified Jan. 16 to report on the current state of military recruiting. The Army already is seeing signs of


a preliminary recruiting slowdown. In 2013, the Army had enough people signed up in the Delayed Entry Program (DEP) to fill about half of its annual recruit- ing goal. But today, the DEP pool is only about one-third full. That’s a “canary in the coal mine in terms of warning about a tough environ- ment ahead,” said Maj. Gen. Thomas Seamands, the Army’s director of military personnel management. Recruiters’ jobs have become more dif-


ficult in recent years as more young people are simply ineligible to serve in the mili- tary due to health issues — mainly obesity, but also other problems such as attention deficit disorder. Prospects also must have graduated from high school or earned a GED to enter military service.


*online: Join the fight against the COLA cuts. Go to www.moaa.org/colafight. 34 MILITARY OFFICER MARCH 2014


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124