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energy wise


Greener Giving Gifts that lower household energy costs and save money


that can help the recipient lower their home energy costs. Below are few ideas to get you thinking “green.”


L Follow the ENERGY STAR


Buy electronic products that come with the Energy Star label. The label means they are more energy-efficient than typical models. Replacing an inefficient old gadget with an energy-saving alternative can save save your friends and loved ones some money on their electric bills.


Investing in a bigger gift? ENERGY STAR TVs and appliances save a bundle on power use. They feature a lower standby-mode consumption than an average device and generally use less energy in all functions.


Smarter Energy Use


Include a smart power strip as part of your gift. Most electronic devices consume energy, even when turned off. In fact, such standby power consumption ranges from 5 percent to 10 percent of a household’s total energy consumption.


Smart power strips save energy by shutting off power to plugged-in gadgets when they go into standby mode. Many smart power strips also have one or two unmonitored, always-on outlets. Use these outlets to


ooking for last minute gift ideas? Consider going the practical route this year by giving items


plug in devices that always need power, like a cordless phone base or alarm system.


For a gadget lover or someone who could benefit from greater energy awareness, give a watt reader like the Kill-A-Watt. This easy-to-use device will reveal a home’s biggest energy guzzlers.


Plug the device into the wall and plug appliances in one-by-one to find out how much energy each appliance is using in real time. By multiplying the electricity used by the cost of electricity, your friend or loved one can find out how much money it costs to run an appliance.


Give one to the teen in your own household and who knows? Maybe they will learn to turn off that big screen TV.


Deck the House in Savings


Is there a Griswold family in your neighborhood? Give them strings of light-emitting diodes (LEDs). A high-quality LED has a life expectancy of 50,000 hours or more.


Consider recycling the retired strands at HolidayLeds.com. The website offers a 25 percent off coupon toward the purchase of new LED holiday lights.





Holiday Lighting Facts •





A household with an extravagant Christmas light display will spend enough money to heat and power an average house for six weeks.


Light-emitting diode, or LED, Christmas tree lights emit a bright, vibrant light that uses 80 percent less energy than conventional tree lights. They are also longer-lasting and stay cooler than traditional bulbs because they don't have a filament. LED lights are suitable for both indoor and outdoor use.





Only 10 percent of the electricity used to light an ordinary light bulb is turned into light. The other 90 percent is wasted as heat.





If every household only used energy-efficient bulbs, enough energy could be saved to close several power plants.





One energy-efficient light bulb will save up to $14. Because it lasts up to 12 times longer, it could save around $120 before it needs replacing.


Recycle all CFL light bulbs safely, as they contain small amounts of mercury: Wear gloves to pick up a bulb, put it in a plastic bag for proper recycling.


For more energy-saving tips, please visit kiamichielectric.org.


Light Post | november-december 2013 | 5


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