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commentar y BOARD OF TRUSTEES


Larry Culwell, President DISTRICT 7


David Ray, Vice President DISTRICT 4


Don Parr, Secretary-Treasurer DISTRICT 5


MEMBERS Dale Shaw


Richard Medlock Doug Binns Mark Ichord


DISTRICT 1 DISTRICT 2 DISTRICT 3 DISTRICT 6


Jim Jackson Executive Vice President-CEO


Kiamichi Electric Cooperative (KEC) is committed to providing reliable and affordable electric service to members in Latimer, LeFlore, Pittsburg, Pushmataha and Atoka counties.


The people and businesses that purchase electricity from Kiamichi Electric are considered member-owners of the co-op. Each member—regardless of how much electricity they purchase – has an equal say in how the cooperative is operated.


To exercise their right, Kiamichi Electric members are encouraged to attend co-op meetings and vote in co-op elections.


Kiamichi Electric service territory is divided into seven districts. Members within each district meet every two years to choose a fellow member to represent their interests on the Kiamichi Electric board of trustees. KEC board members set policy and oversee cooperative business.


Through local leadership and control, Kiamichi Electric Cooperative members can rest assured their electric co-op remains focused on the needs of its members and its rural communities.


A Balanced Policy is Best Co-ops need coal to keep electric rates affordable


abandoned an all-of-the-above energy strategy for an all-but-one approach that effectively removes coal from the nation’s fuel mix in the future.


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The policy, proposed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), sets strict limits on carbon dioxide emissions from future coal or natural gas plants. Trouble is, the new standards are impossible to meet with existing technology.


For several years co-ops have tested carbon capture and storage (CCS) as a way to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Unfortunately, the technology doesn’t make financial sense. It's never been used at a commercial scale power plant over a prolonged period to demonstrate its viability or cost. In a 2012 congressional report, engineers estimate it would increase the cost of producing electricity at coal-based plants by 75 percent!


The new regulations would limit Americans’ access to a plentiful and affordable resource. I don’t think we should gamble with the economic well-being of future generations and our nation's economy.


Already worried about making ends meet, many of Kiamichi Electric members can't afford the significant increases in electric bills that this policy would trigger.


operation roundup


Monthly Financial Report YEAR TODATE COLLECTIONS:


YEAR TODATE DISBURSEMENTS: TOTAL COLLECTED SINCE INCEPTION:


$73,553.51 $80,992.45


$1,091,485.90 TOTAL DISBURSEMENTS SINCE INCEPTION: $1,037,630.86 2 | november-december | Light Post


Operation Roundup is a voluntary bill roundup program that benefits southeast Oklahoma communities, organizations and needy families. Applications for funds are available at Kiamichi Electric, local social services , or online at www.kiamichielectric.org.


lectric cooperatives are disappointed—but not surprised— that the Administration officially


Historically, the price of coal remains affordable and relatively stable. The U.S. Energy Information Agency reports the United States has 236 years remaining of coal reserves. Coal generates 37 percent of the nation’s electricity—our biggest energy source by far.


By Jim Jackson CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER


We saw this all-but-one game in 1978 when Congress passed the Power Plant and Industrial Fuel Use Act. The measure banned natural gas for power generation so electric co-ops were forced to choose between building coal or nuclear plants.


Back then, co-ops were in the midst of a major power plant building cycle. With few options, they invested heavily in coal- based generating plants in the late 1970s and early 1980s. Thankfully Congress repealed its mistake, but not for nine years.


Let’s not repeat past mistakes. We need members to stand with us to keep electric bills affordable. Raise your voice through the Cooperative Action Network at www. action.coop. Tell the EPA we need an all-of-the-above energy strategy.


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