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A DOUBLE A C T


With their history, markets, designer shops, and much more, suggest a minimum of two nights each in Hong Kong and Macau, says John Oates


I


f you have never been to Hong Kong it probably evokes images of gleaming skyscrapers, harbour views and hectic markets. All that’s true – you’ll fi nd all the urban


bustle you could possibly want among the towers of Central or the traditional markets of Kowloon – but there’s also so much more to discover. “Hong Kong holds many surprises,” says Neill Prothero, Far East Product Manager for Cox & Kings, “with spectacular rural scenery, the bays of Sai Kung and many quiet outlying islands”. Most underestimate the size of Hong Kong, which covers an area of 1,104 sq kms (425 sq miles) and includes 260 outlying islands, as well as Hong Kong Island itself plus – on the mainland – Kowloon and the New Territories. “With all this space there is a variety of activities to


suit all tastes,” explains Dawn Page, Director for UK and Northern Europe at the Hong Kong Tourism Board. “There are walking tours, luxury shops and markets


for shoppers, temples and gardens for culture seekers and over 11,000 restaurants – ranging from high-end Michelin-starred to delicious local cafes – for foodies.” What’s more, and again contrary to expectations, Hong


Kong can be done on a budget. “Some of the key attractions of the city are relatively low cost or free,” Page adds, “such as Tai Chi classes, museum passes and Star Ferry trips”. There’s also the famous Symphony of Lights, a free nightly laser show best viewed


From left: Fireworks festival, Macau; Chinese opera in action, Hong Kong; Portuguese architecture, Macau; A-Ma Temple, Macau; the Big Buddha, Lantau Island, Hong Kong.


www.sellinglonghaul.com • March 2013 45


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