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LizMcKeon advises on how to design and write effective job advertisements


The best techniques for writing effective job advertisements are the same as for other forms of advertising. The job is the product and the readers of the job advert are your potential customers.


The aimof the job advert is to attract interest, communicate the essential points quickly, and provide a clear response process. Design should concentrate on clarity, text, layout and on conveying a professional image. Branding should be present.


Job adverts and recruitment processes should follow the classicalAIDA selling format:


Attention Interest Desire Action


Thismeans that good job advertisements much first attract attention, attract relevant interest, create desire and finally provide a clear instruction for the response.


The attention part is the banner that makes an impressive benefit promise. Interest builds information in an interesting way, usuallymeaning that this must relate closely to the way the reader thinks about the issues concerned. Since job adverts aimto produce a response youmust then create desire, which relates job appeal and rewards to the reader so that they will aspire to them and want them. Finally, youmust prompt action, whichmay be to call a telephone number or to send a CV.


Job adverts that fail to follow these vital principles will fail to attract job applicants of quality in quantity.


job advert writing tips


Use one simple headline, andmake the job advert headline relevant and clear. The logical headline is the job title itself – after all, this is what people are looking for.


If your salon is well known and has a great reputation then show the brand name prominently, as a strapline ormain heading with the job title, or incorporated in the job advert frame design.


Make the advert easy to read. Use simple language, avoid complicated words unless absolutely necessary, and keep enough space around the text to attract attention to it. Less is more. Giving text some space is a very powerful way of attracting the eye, and also a way of ensuring you write efficiently - efficient writing enables efficient reading. Use simple type-styles and avoid italics and shadows as these reduce readability.


Use language that your potential employees would use, and use short sentences – more than 15 words in a


sentence reduces the clarity of meaning. Use bullet points and short bite-sized paragraphs: a lot of words in one paragraph is very off-putting to the reader.


Get the reader involved. Refer to the reader as ‘you’ and use the second person (you, your, yours) in the description of the requirements and expectations of the candidate and the job role. This helps people to visualise themselves in the role, as it involves them.


Try to incorporate something new, innovative, exciting, challenging – therapists are attracted to new things, either in the salon or the role.


Stress what is unique: you must emphasise what makes your job and organisation special. People want to work for special employers and are generally not motivated to seek work with boring, run-of-the-mill salons. And remember that job advert descriptions must be credible.


GUILD NEWS 41


JobAdvertChecklist


 Job title  Employee or salon name  Location of job Description of the business  Outline of job role and purpose  Indication or scale, size, responsibility, timescale  Outline of ideal candidate profile  Indicate qualifications and experience required  Salary or salary guide


Whether the role is full-time, permanent or a short-term contract


 Other package details (commission etc)  Explanation of recruitment process  Response and application instructions  Contact details  Job and advert reference


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