This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
winter skin soothers


As theweather changes, so does


the skin. Introduce your clients to Winter skin soothers to treat dehydration and sensitivity.


There’s nothing quite like the great British weather – oneminute it’s sunny, the next it’s chucking it down with rain, but now that the temperature has dropped and the nights are closing in, it’s time to think about the effects that the harshWinter weathermay have on your clients’ skin.


“Exposure to theWinter elements can cause a range of unwelcome skin concerns from dehydration, dryness and flaky patches through to sensitisation and extreme chapping.The primary trigger for this skin sensitisation is extremes of weather and climate, including cold and humidity changes,” explains Sally Penford, Education Manager UK and Eire forThe International Dermal Institute.


“It is important to appreciate the difference between dry and dehydrated skin,” adds Elaine Bryant,TrainingManager forYon- Ka UK. “Dehydrated skin is caused by a lack ofmoisture and dry skin is a lack of sebumor oil.”As temperatures drop, so does humidity,meaning that there is less moisture in the air.Add to this the drying- out effects of central heating and the skin’s natural barriers will prevent it from functioning properly, leading to tautness, sensitivity and flakiness.


DeborahMitchell of Heaven Skincare agrees: “There are two [key] factors that can cause dry skin in theWinter.The cold,


harsh outside weather as well as [the] skin’s natural ability to produce oil; skin also struggles to get the oil to the surface leaving it dry and chapped.”


Crystal Clear’sMD, Sharon Hilditch,MBE, goes on to explain: “During cold weather when temperatures and humidity are low, the skin is stripped of its natural lipid layer.The purpose of the natural lipid layer is to prevent the skin fromdrying out, a decrease inmoisture fromyour skin can cause the inevitable tight, dry, flaky, peeling and generally uncomfortable skin conditions. Dry air fromfires and other heating sources also suck themoisture out of skin.


“If the skin temperature falls during periods of cold weather, the surface blood vessels dilate (get wider) rather than constrict which can actually cause damage to surface capillaries in the skin leading to sore, red cheeks and nose.


“To help keep skin soft and supple, the aim is to not to addmoisture to skin, but to keep moisture in.The use of a humidifier in the home is very beneficial as they tend to moisturise the air, which is likely being dried out by central heating or fires,” Sharon adds.


Of course, nobody expects their clients to live like hermits and stay indoors throughout theWintermonths, so as a skin specialist it’s up to you to educate your clients on the best way to protect their skin tominimise any damage.


“People need to understand their skin changes all the time,” adds Elaine. “You need to know what skin type you have and use the correct product to suit.”


Sally agrees: “The first step in breaking the cycle of sensitisation is removing as many triggers from the contact-sphere as possible. Lifestyle choices which are under the client’s control are an obvious place to start, such as drinking more water, avoiding great changes in temperature, hot baths, saunas and the like and making good product choices.”


But when it comes to making the right product choices, many clients become stuck as they are overwhelmed by the range of different products and ingredients available, and this is where you can help!


Make sure you begin each treatment with a full consultation, although I realise this may be the norm for many of you, some of your more regular clients’ needs may have changed since you last carried out a consultation with them and therefore it’s important to ensure you have an up-to-date idea of what their specific skin problem may be.


Once you’ve established the issue, and identified the potential cause, it’s time to consider what treatment regimen and in particular which ingredients may suit your clients best.


GUILD NEWS 27


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124