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Minimal Knowledge


Three stripped-back Robert Hood classics


Robert Hood ‘Minus’ Five minutes of nothing happening to jaw-dropping


effect, the ever-moving arpeggios of this highlight from ‘Internal Empire’ can still be heard in the techno that fills Berlin every weekend.


Robert Hood ‘After Hours’ The second installment in the ‘Nighttime World’


series brought together funk, cinematic and ambient influences to show that Robert wasn’t only about minimal muscularity. This marriage of jazz and techno still produces chills.


Floorplan ‘Funky Souls’ This first release under his more soulful moniker


showed that Robert could do sample-based house music just as effectively as techno. A loop that never ends and a bouncing drum line that’s been copied ever since.


split, as he realized that less could be much more.


Ever since ‘Internal Empire’ exploded onto the techno scene back in 1994, showing that techno didn’t need to be about who could be quickest or loudest, but rather who could get people to lose it on the dancefloor, the minimal approach has fathered countless bastard offspring over two decades of cross-pollination. And although Robert recognizes that his vision is a long way from the strands of minimal that enrapture festival crowds and shift enormous units on Beatport these days, he isn’t bitter, least of all about the success of that other son of


Detroit (or just over the river in Windsor, Canada) and minimal evangelist, Richie


Hawtin. “Richie’s idea of minimalism is not going to be the same as Robert Hood’s idea of minimalism,” he smiles, diplomatically. “I’ll just say that within the last 10 years or so, it has taken on a cleaner, more polished sound. I don’t want to say it’s gotten away from the groove because there is a certain groove that someone like Magda has, there is a certain industrialised rhythm and that’s fine. Berlin and Germany as a whole may see it from a different point of view than I do.” When pressed on what exactly that point of view is, he describes it as “more of a soulful groove”, before going on to explain the music he grew up with, that informs his own sound — Detroit’s Motown heritage,


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