This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
GOING THE


EXTRA MILE


approach politics. So it feels good to politely tip one’s cap to the elephant in the room, and then shove it out of the door. “My parents were left-wing,” he says. “The thing about Israel is that everyone has an opinion. You have to have one. People have so many ideas about Israel, but most people, they want peace. The right-wing attitude, I’ve never really encountered it, though maybe at football stadiums.”


SOCCER YOUTH Gerber knows a little about those. He was a youth player for Maccabi Tel Aviv, the most venerable of all Israeli sides, and the one with the most silverware. Up to the age of 17, his fate was more or less sealed. “My father would piss off my mother,” he says. “He


would go to parent’s evening, and say ‘if the school is interrupting the football, he should leave school’. I felt the same, of course. I loved it. I wasn’t a good student, let’s say that.” He played right midfield, a passing player rather than a goal scorer. But then it was all fucked up, largely thanks to Depeche Mode, The Smiths and Joy Division. “It seemed stupid that while all my friends were going out, I had to stay in and prepare for the game. And I’d train all summer. So I said, ‘Fuck that shit, I’m leaving’. For years, my father was broken. It upset him very much. But what I can say about them is that my parents always let me do whatever I wanted to. They would always support their kids in whatever they wanted to do. I got an enormous amount of love from them. The team was shocked. They called me for


www.djmag.com


GOING THE


EXTRA MILE


Jetting between the European capitals and LA, working with Visionquest, Sven Väth and a certain P Diddy is all in a day’s


work for Israeli DJ/producer Guy Gerber. With a recent Fabric mix under his belt, made up of his own entirely new tracks, it was high time we linked up with the party-loving raconteur to find out what floats his boat…


Words: BEN ARNOLD Pics: CHRIS DAVISON


eight years, every single summer, to try to persuade me to go back to training, renewing my season ticket in case I went to another team. It was hard.” But the choice, ultimately, was obvious to him. “I think I was better at soccer than I am at music, but I never regretted it, because I love making music. It’s what I love to do.”


The first song that he says exposed him to ‘good music’ rather than the pop music in the Israeli charts was ‘Lullaby’ by The Cure. “I found it so very different from anything else, and I was very curious about it,” he says. From there the progression was linear — through to The Smiths and Joy Division, the Happy Mondays, My Bloody Valentine, the Stone Roses. He had a teenage band called, he says a bit sheepishly,


023


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82