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JULY 2012  LET’S SAVE ENERGY TOGETHER


Renting your home? That’s no reason to ignore efficiency


BY JOHN DRAKE 


P


eople who rent their homes sometimes feel powerless over their electric bills. But just


because you don’t own your home doesn’t mean you can’t cut costs. There are lots of low- or no-cost tricks that renters can put into place to cut down on electricity use.


Electronics and Appliances The notion that regularly powering down your computer will shorten its life is outdated. The U.S. Department of Energy consumer website, EnergySavers. gov, offers this guideline: If you won’t use your computer for more than 20 minutes, shut off the monitor; if you won’t use it for more than two hours, shut the whole thing down.


Most electronics feature a glowing light when turned off—that means they’re still drawing electricity. A quick fix for this “vampire” or phantom load is plugging various devices into a power strip. Simply flip the switch on the power strip when you won’t be using the devices.


While your hands are most likely tied when it comes to the types of major appliances installed, if one needs to be replaced, lobby your landlord to purchase an ENERGY STAR model. Visit energystar.gov for more information on particular products.


Weatherizing A roll of weather stripping and a


tube of caulk can go a long way in saving energy and money. Check for gaps around doors and windows. If you can see daylight, ask your landlord if you can seal cracks and reduce air flow. While you’re at it, won’t hurt to ask if he or she will pay the cost if you do the labor.


Seal drafty windows using sealing kits available at any Walmart or home improvement store. Curtains can also help— close them in the summer to block sunlight, and open them in the winter to let the warmth in.


A few more simple tips can help shave your electric bills:


 Use CFL light bulbs.


 Vacuum the coils in the bottom panel of your 


 Keep your dryer vents clean. Clogged refrigerator coils and dryer vents will cause your appliances to work harder and increase the risk of fire.


 Don’t allow furniture to block air vents, and shut the vents in rooms you don’t use.


 Set your water heater


temperature at no more than 120°F. That’s plenty hot for daily showers and chores.


When you’re trying to save energy and money, it’s good to know you’re not alone. Feel free to call me or Mark Zachary at 800-780-6486, ext. 233. We’re happy to help you find ways to save.


Lucky Account #22766001. If this number matches the account number on your bill, please call 800-780-6486 for a $25 bill credit.


Energy Campers return


Kacee Schier, Antlers, Victoria Mayhall, Idabel, and Lacee Allen, Hugo represented Choctaw Electric Cooperative at the 2012 YouthPower Energy Camp. The five-day camp was held at Canyon Camp in Hinton in June. Energy Camp encourages leadership skills in eighth grade students by teaching them about cooperatives. For more details, please visit www.choctawelectric.coop.


PAGE 7


Special Olympics Volunteers


Choctaw Electric employees volunteered their time to the 2012 Special Olympic Games. The event was held on May 9-11 in Stillwater. From left, Rocky Roxberry (Hugo office); Mary Ann Webb (Idabel office); Tonia Allred (Hugo office); and Bart Tedder (Hugo office).


CEC


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