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Page 2 C A N A D I A N V A L L E Y


P.O. Box 751 Seminole, Okla. 74818 Serving Hughes, Lincoln, McIntosh, Okfuskee, Pottawatomie, Seminole and portions of Oklahoma, Cleveland and Creek counties


ELECTRALITE


Main Office and Headquarters Interstate 40 at the Prague/Seminole Exit


Area Office


35 W JC Watts Street, Eufaula Office Hours


8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday -Friday Board of Trustees


President— Matt Goodson, Tecumseh ......................District 5 Vice President — Robert Schoenecke, Meeker .........District 2 Secretary-Tres.—Steve Marak, Meeker ....................District 1 Asst. Sec/Treas. — Joe Semtner, Konawa ................District 6 ..............................................District 8


Yates Adcock, Dustin


Gary Crain, Prague.....................................................District 3 Clayton Eads, Shawnee .............................................District 4 J.P, Duvall, Seminole .................................................District 7 George E Hand .....................................................Manager J. Roger Henson ....................................................Attorney Ann Weaver ...........................................................Editor


Telephone Numbers


Seminole .........................................................(405) 382-3680 Shawnee, Tecumseh, Earlsboro ......................(405) 273-4680 Toll free.............................................................(877)382-3680 Eufaula ........................................................... (918) 689-3232


Read


Cycle 1 Cycle 2 Cycle 3


26th-31st 6th-11th 16th-21st


In Case of Trouble


1. Check for blown fuse or tripped circuit breakers. 2. Check with your neighbors. Ask if their electricity is off and if they have reported it.


3. If not call the office and report the trouble.


Operating Statistics for April 2011


Operating Revenues .......................... Wholesale Cost of Power .................. Percentage WPC is of Revenue .................. Revenue Per Mi of Line: MTD ................ $795.91 Consumers per mile of line:MTD .................. 4.56 KWPeak Demand -This Month ................ 113,254 Billing KW Demand ..................................110,748 KW Peak Demand: YTD .......................... 162,960 KWH Purchased - This Month ............. 54,299,960 Taxes Paid ............................................... $85,541 Interest on Long Term Debt ................... $185,866 System Load Factor ...................................... 66.6


$4,108,483 $3,143,665 76.51


2012


$4,029,716 $3,027,658


75.13


$778.39 4.59


160,468 115,112 160,468


54,866,500 $83,883


$182,853 47.5


New Services Staked in May During the month of May 71 new services were staked. The total new services staked in 2012 is 452. This compares to 410 for the same period in 2011.


Billing date 5th


15th 25th


1-1/2% penalty is applied 20


after billing date


CVEC offices will be closed on Wednesday, July 4, and open for regu- lar business hours on July 5


By George cont.


maximizes energy efficiency and embraces all domestic fuels including nuclear, natural gas, renewable and coal.


The fastest growing economy in the world, China, continues to expand the use of coal to power its growing world industrial presence. The United States is actually exporting coal to China to use there to help power China’s economy. Yet we are limiting our economy by attempting to take coal off the table as an energy source for our domestic businesses, industries and workers. In Oklahoma we are blessed with an abundance of natural gas. It makes great economic sense for our generating utilities to look to natural gas and renewable (wind and solar) to power our future needs. Energy is a world commodity and will be pretty much priced as such.


Affordable energy is the key to the standard of living we have come to enjoy in our nation and the hope for the same for people throughout the world. We expect our American businesses and workers to compete in the global economy. Increasing the price we pay in this country for electricity with regulations by which we are required to operate, hurts those at the lower end of the economic scale first. That is most of us.


Our President has said that he is for, “All of the above” as his energy strategy. These new rules are not consistent with that state- ment. Any new rules must be fair, affordable and achievable. Our economy, while still fragile is dependent on affordable electricity. We as a nation cannot afford to abandon our most abundant energy resource, coal.


916461500


I know the majority of people have probably quit reading at this point. If you are still here and want to do something, at least let the EPA and the elected officials know in writing, that you op- pose their proposed rules which could lead to abandoning billions of dollars of generating facilities with replacement at ratepayer expense and the loss of coal as an energy source.


Write to the Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, D.C. and tell them what you believe they should do.


FINANCIAL STATEMENT


BEGINNING BALANCE 4/30/12.....$157,581.10 Deposits ........................................................7,621.42 Interest Income .................................................7.59 Checks Issued ............................................-7,984.28 Approved, not yet paid ............................-11,199.17 BALANCE 5/31/12............................$146,026.66


The ElectraLite


JULY 2012


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