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ElectraLite Upgrade window treatments to keep sun out


If the sun loves to beat on your house all summer, show it who’s boss by updating your window treatments. Don’t stop with new drapes or indoor blinds. The sun will fade and ruin them unless you also add sunscreens, especially on the west and south sides of the house. You can mount sunscreens on the inside of the windows under your drapes. Or, invest in honeycomb shades with double cells, which are easy to install, reasonably priced and come in variety of colors. A tip: Choose a style that allows you to lower the window cover from the top down in- stead of having to raise it from the bottom up. That way, you’ll still get a lot of light and have a nice view of the sky without letting direct sunlight into the room or sacrificing your privacy. A few other tips: • If you have a skylight, cover it with a motorized cellular shade or screen to keep the hot sun from beating down on the room in the early afternoon. You just push a button to easily open and close it. • For bedrooms and home theaters, consider black-out shades with a sliding track sys- tem on the sides to close the gap between the fabric and the window. The plastic track locks out the light and can reduce the loss of your cool, indoor air by up to 65 percent.


If your air conditioner’s thermostat is set below 75 degrees and your house is still too hot, it’s a good bet the cool air is leaking out through cracks and holes around your win- dows or the attic, or around electrical outlets and penetrations where cable and phone lines come into the building. Or your home’s older exterior doors are


Do your exterior doors let the heat in? or older.


Older steel doors, for example, often are


hollow. Today’s improved models have a core of foam insulation and a seal that prevents air from escaping between the edge of the door and its frame when the door is closed. Fiber- glass doors are built with interior insulation as well.


energy inefficient. It’s not uncommon for homeowners to overlook the doors when they replace the old, single-pane windows their homes “came with” double-pane models that help save en- ergy. But just as much air can escape through or around an energy-inefficient old door, even if there’s no glass on it. A new exterior door is likely to fit more snugly into its opening, and it’s bound to be better insulated than one that’s a decade old


It’s a no-brainer that buy- ing fresh fruit, produce, milk and meat from local farm- ers helps the community’s economy. It’s also an energy saver.


When you patronize local


farmer’s markets and produce stands, you forego the food sold in grocery stores, which ship in much of their fare from out of town. The more traveling your bananas, bread and beef have to do before you buy it, the more greenhouse emissions they contribute to the


And new sliding-glass patio doors, like windows, feature several layers of glass and energy-efficient coatings that keep the hot air outdoors and your nice, cool air inside during the summer.


If you want to keep your old doors, you can stop some of the leaking by applying weather-stripping around them. And you can sometimes adjust sagging doors that have settled in and no longer quite fit their frames without leaving a gap.


Eat locally grown foods and save energy


environment. In fact, some es- timate that between 5 percent and 20 percent of the energy spent in the production of food is for transporting it—some- times as much as 1,500 miles from where it was grown—to


your local grocer.


Do your small part for the environment by choosing your chow from the many locals who can deliver it to you with a far smaller carbon footprint than stores that import it from far away.


JULY 2012 Pay Stations


You may pay your power bill any time during regular working hours at the headquarters office in Seminole or at the area office in Eufaula. A drive-thru window makes paying bills at the head- quarters office quick and easy. Both the Seminole and Eufaula offices have night deposit boxes for your convenience.


In addition, CVEC has teamed up with several area businesses and banks to allow you to make payments close to home. Bills can be paid at any of the loca- tions below at any time during the month with your stub. If you choose to make payment at any of these locations, keep in mind these payments will not be received by our office for at least three business days. So please watch your due date. Upon receiving your payments at our office, we will credit your account.


Eufaula–Bank of Oklahoma Shawnee–Arvest Bank Shawnee–BancFirst Shawnee–First United Bank Shawnee-Vision Bank Seminole–BancFirst Seminole–First United Bank Harrah–BancFirst


Holdenville–The Bank, N.A. Konawa–BancFirst Tecumseh–BancFirst Tecumseh–First United Bank Maud–The Bank, N.A. McLoud–BancFirst Meeker– BancFirst Meeker–Vision Bank Noble–First State Bank Paden–Citizens State Bank Prague–BancFirst Prague–Vision Bank Wanette-First State Bank Wetumka–Citizens Security Bank Wewoka–First National Bank Wewoka–Security State Bank


Mark your calendar for Canadian Valley Electric Cooperative’s Annual Meeting on September 15, 2012 at the Shawnee Heart of Oklahoma Exposition Center


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