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win $300 and have your photo in oklahoma Living !


Hit us with your best shot, readers! Oklahoma Living is now accept- ing submissions for the 2013 Photo Calendar! Pick a category for your picture, and include a $5 entry fee for each photo submitted. Funds generated from calendar sales will go to a charity! Enter online at www.ok-living.coop or mail entries with form below to Oklahoma Living Calendar Contest, P.O. Box 54309, OKC-OK 73154-1309.


choose a month (OR MORE) to enter


✓ January: Winter Landscape ✓ February: People ✓ March: Nature (animals) ✓ April: Nature (fl owers) ✓ May: Sunset/Sunrise ✓ June: Summer Landscape (lakes or rivers)


✓ July: Americana ✓ August: Kids Being Kids ✓ September: Agriculture (landscape, people or animals)


✓ October: Fall Landscape ✓ November: Black and White (open category)


✓ December: Architecture


Name: Address: Phone: Cooperative: Location of Photo: Category/Month: Entry Fee (Please circle one): Check Cash


RULES and eligibility:


- One grand-prize winner will receive $300 and12 other winners will receive a $50 gift card. All winning photos will be published in OKL


- Submitted photographs will not be returned and winning images become the property of OKL for use in print, on our website and in our social media sites


- Mailed entries MUST come as 8X10 prints or on a CD. Digital entries must be high resolution (300 dpi)


- Photos must be taken in Oklahoma


- Photos should be taken by a member or family relative of a rural electric cooperative member in Oklahoma


- All entries must be received by September 15th


Longtime electric cooperative leader Max Ott retires By Linda Warner, AEC


A


lfalfa Electric Cooperative (AEC) headquar- tered in Cherokee, Okla., will bid a farewell to longtime General Manager Max W. Ott who will retire August 2012. Ott—who initiated his career at AEC in 1975 as an engineer—plans on moving to St. Louis, Mo., and spending time with his grandkids. Max has demonstrated exceptional service to the electric cooperative industry over a ca- reer spanning more than 37 years. He has represent- ed Oklahoma cooperatives at the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA) Board for over seven years, served and chaired countless committees throughout the utility industry. Ott has also served as president on the Oklahoma As- sociation of Electric Cooperatives (OAEC) and the Western Farmers Electric Cooperative boards and chaired OAEC’s Board for the search for its present general manager, Chris Meyers. He also serves as Al-


ternate on the Kansas Electric Cooperative Board. His leadership will be deeply missed. A retirement “come and go” luncheon is scheduled for Friday, Aug. 3 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the First Bap- tist Church Annex, 614 S. Grand, in Cherokee, Okla.


All in the electric co- operative circuit, AEC’s


members and community leaders are encouraged to attend.


The Board at AEC has selected Colin Whitley, cur- rent general manager with the Kansas Power Pool as Ott’s replacement. AEC will welcome Whitley into the cooperative community on July 1, 2012. OL


To submit a question for Willie, visit www.ok-living.coop.


Dear Willie,


I have two lamps on timers which are on the most but when I bought CFL bulbs for them a while ago it said not to use with timers. Are there any new bulbs out that can be used with timers?


-Barbara Dear Barbara,


All Compact Fluorescent Lights, or CFLs, have usage restrictions associated with them. Repu- table manufacturers print such restrictions on the product packaging. Most manufacturers also state these restrictions in their product catalogs. I’ve been in the lighting business for 28-plus years; I would recommend interpreting the restric- tions this way: CFLs shouldn’t be used in totally enclosed environments, not on dimmers, timers, or photocells.


From experience, CFLs will work in each of those situations except with dimmers. Remember though, this use is not recommended. If you use CFLs in these situations it will drastically reduce the life of your CFL. With dimmers, it can instant- ly pop or blow out your CFL, but not always. In recent years, lighting manufacturers have released CFLs that are dimmable; however, these new dimmable CFLs work on some dimmers but not all dimmers, and they only dim 40 percent to 60 percent. If you have a dimmer, it’s best to use an in- candescent or halogen product. LED is another new energy-saving product that is the buzz word in lighting today. LEDs are starting to fi nd their way to end users, but they are not without their own limitations.


LEDs are manufactured in both dimmable and non-dimmable versions. The dimmable version also states on the packaging that they may not work on some dimmers. CFL and LED products are both energy-saving products, but come with restrictions. Incandescent and halogen products have no restrictions; however, they aren’t nearly as energy effi cient.


My suggestion is to wait on the LED technology a couple more years. The technology will improve and the price will begin to decrease. At this time LEDs are very expensive and unregulated for the most part. Thank you for your inquiry!


Willie Big thanks to our source:


Keith L. Kennedy, President Light Bulb Supply Company, Inc. 629 West Hefner Rd, OKC-OK 73114 Offi ce: 405-755-2852 Fax: 405-752-8619 Email: lbsokc@aol.com


JULY 2012 5 Ask Willie!


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