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OKLAHOMA EAT S


Canning Made Easy F


Blueberry-Spice Jam Tomato Salsa Dill Pickles


rom juicy tomatoes to sweet corn and refreshing water- melon, summer brings with it a delicious variety of fresh veg- etables and fruits. When your gar- den and the farmers’ markets are overfl owing with produce, it’s time to think ahead to winter. According to Barbara Brown, PhD, Oklahoma State Cooperative Extension Service food specialist, home canning is a healthy and economic way to pre- serve some of summer’s abundance. For the inexperienced canner, she recommends reading through the general canning information found on the National Center for Home Food Preservation website at http://nchfp.uga.edu/how/general. html before beginning. She also sug- gests starting with foods that can be processed in a boiling water canner, such as jams, jellies and fruits. The


Tomato Salsa Yields 4 pints


✓ 4 cups peeled, cored, chopped Roma toma- toes


✓ 2 cups seeded, chopped Anaheim pep- pers


✓ ½ cup seeded, chopped jalapeño pep- pers


✓ ¾ cup chopped onion


✓ 4 cloves garlic, fi nely chopped


✓ 2 cups vinegar (at least 5% acidity)


✓ 1 t ground cumin ✓ 1 T oregano ✓ 1 T chopped fresh cilantro ✓ 1 ½ t salt


Preheat the broiler. Cut the tomatoes in half and remove the cores and seeds. Cut the Anaheim and jala- peño peppers in half and remove the seeds and stems. Place the


30 OKLAHOMA LIVING 30 OKLAHOMA LIVING


Photo courtesy of Scooter Bivins


Blueberry-Spice Jam Yields 5 half-pints


tomatoes and peppers on a baking tray, cut side down. Broil until the peels are charred. Remove from the oven and allow them to cool. Remove the skins from the cooled tomatoes and peppers and chop them into small pieces. Measure 4 cups of the tomatoes, 2 cups of the Anaheim peppers and ½ cup of the jalapeño peppers into a large pot. Add the remaining ingredients and bring the salsa to a boil, stir- ring frequently. Reduce the heat and simmer 20 minutes, stirring oc- casionally. Fill hot pint jars with salsa, leaving ½ inch of headspace. Remove air bubbles, wipe jar rims, and place a lid and metal screw- on band on each jar. Process jars for 15* minutes in a boiling water canner.


✓ 2 ½ pints fresh blueberries ✓ 1 T lemon juice ✓ ½ t cinnamon ✓ ¾ cup water ✓ 1 – 1 ¾ oz box pectin ✓ 5 ½ cups sugar


Wash the blueberries. Add them to a saucepan, one layer at a time, crushing them with a po- tato masher. Add the lemon juice, cinnamon, water and pectin and bring the mixture to a full rolling boil over high heat, stirring fre- quently. Add the sugar and return the mixture to a full rolling boil. Boil hard for 1 minute, stirring constantly. Remove the jam from the heat, quickly skim off any foam, and fi ll sterile jars, leaving ¼ inch of headspace. Wipe jar rims, and place a lid and metal screw-on band on each jar. Process jars for 5* minutes in a boiling water canner.


* For altitudes between 1,000 and 6,000 feet, add 5 minutes to the processing time. Above 6,000 feet, add 10 minutes.


To view special online only content, download our digital edition at www.ok-living.coop or download our free app on iTunes.


up-front investment for a boiling water canner is approximately $20; whereas a pressure canner can cost $60.


“Give it a try before you invest a lot,” Brown says. “Canning is some- thing that takes some time and you may decide it’s not for you.” Most importantly, Brown stresses that canning is a scientifi c process, not a creative one, and for food safe- ty it’s important to stick to tested recipes from a reliable source—such as the ones below from the U.S. De- partment of Agriculture.


“Canning can be a little tricky. It’s important to follow instructions carefully,” Brown says. For the canning novice, Oklahoma


Living’s digital edition offers some canning basics available at www.ok- living.coop. -


Laura Araujo


Dill Pickles Yields 7 to 9 pints


✓ 8 lbs pickling cucumbers ✓ 2 gals water ✓ 1- ¼ cups pickling salt ✓ 1-½ qts vinegar (at least 5% acidity) ✓ ¼ cup sugar ✓ 2 qts water ✓ 2 T pickling spice ✓ 3 T mustard seed ✓ 4 ½ T dill seed ✓ 9 cloves garlic


Wash the cucumbers and cut the blossom (non-stem) end off. In a large, non-alumi- num pot or bowl, dissolve 3/4 cup of the salt in 2 gallons of water. Add the cucumbers and refrigerate overnight. The next day, combine the remaining ½ cup of salt, the vinegar, the sugar, and 2 quarts of water in a large pot. Tie the pickling spice in a piece of cheesecloth and place it in the pot. Bring the contents of the pot to a boil. Into hot pint jars, place 1 teaspoon of mustard seed, 1 ½ teaspoons dill seed and one clove of garlic. Drain the salt water from the cucumbers and pack them into the jars. Cover the cucum- bers with the boiling pickling solution, leav- ing ½ inch of headspace. Remove air bubbles, wipe jar rims, and place a lid and metal screw-on band on each jar. Process jars for 10* minutes in a boiling water canner. OL


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