This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
A SUPPLEMENT TO OKLAHOMA LIVING


®


LIVEWIRE JULY 2012 | VO LUME 63 ISSUE 7 | PU B LISHED FOR MEMBERS OF TR I -CO U NT Y E L ECTR IC COOPERAT IV E


According to the National Cooperative Business Association (NCBA), more than 29,200 cooperatives of many different types nationally employ 2 million Americans. One in every four Americans is a co-op member, but the scope of the cooperative network doesn’t stop at the border. Cooperatives are a global network of independent, local businesses owned by those they serve. “Co-ops are a major economic force in industrialized countries and provide a powerful business model for developing nations,”


A


notes Paul Hazen, NCBA president & CEO. Tri-County Electric’s Vice President of Corporate Services Zac Perkins said, “Cooperatives of every type abound in our area.


Regardless of the type of cooperative you belong to, members can guarantee their cooperative will put them first and will be innovative. Together, cooperative members build a better world. “Locally, our members have seen the cooperative principles at work when we come together with the local phone cooperative to make charitable contributions to organizations like the Texas County Family YMCA.” Tri-County Electric and Panhandle Telephone Cooperative, Inc . (PTCI) are able to come together because they share a common set of business principles like concern for community, cooperation among cooperatives and democracy. Both cooperatives exist to meet the needs of their members, sharing the history of being founded to fill a need where others wouldn’t. Unlike competitive, profit-driven businesses, co-ops cooperate with each other to fashion programs that improve service. For example, food co-ops introduced food nutrition labels long before they were federally required in 1994. Credit unions fought the predatory practices of payday lenders by introducing salary advance loans that double as savings accounts. Locally, Tri-County Electric and PTCI are coming together to celebrate 2012 as the International Year of Cooperatives. The


United Nations declares international years to draw attention to and encourage action on major issues. The two cooperatives are hosting celebrations around the Oklahoma Panhandle in conjunction with the United Nations International Year of Cooperatives declaration. The first one will be in Guymon at Thompson Park on Sunset Lake on Thursday, July 26, from 5 – 7 pm. There will be free train rides, hot dogs, watermelon, ice cold water, and fun for the whole family. Watch for more events in Beaver and Boise City during the county fairs in the coming months. Visit any of the following websites for more information about the


International Year of Cooperatives as well as your local cooperatives: n www.usa2012.coop n www.2012.coop n www.un.org n www.ptci.net n www.tri-countyelectric.coop


Questions? Email Coops2012@ptsi.net.


s a cooperative, Tri-County Electric does not stand alone. It is part of the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA), which is the service organization for more than 900 not-for-profit electric cooperatives and public power districts across the nation.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148