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CUT UTILITY COST BY 40%


SPRAY FOAM INSULATION & ROOFING


A division of Link Painting • Serving OKC Since 1938 405-370-0423 FINANCING AVAILABLE


• Livestock Barns • Hay Barns • Shops • Garages


40x60x12


1-walk door, 1 sliding door colored metal $


13,50000 30x40x10 garage


1-walk door, 2 overhead door 13,70000


frameouts, 4” concrete floor $


24x30x10 w/concrete floor one entry door, two windows, one overhead door frameout, fully insulated, $


12,50000 Variety of sizes available.


– 16 years in business, 26 years total experience


– 40 year warranty on metal – 5 year warranty on material and labor


– Pad leveling and concrete floors – Insured


Hiring exp. barn builders


D CROSS BARN COMPANY Statewide Service


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30’X50’x10’ Fully Enclosed ...... $6,975.00 30’X50’x10’ With 15’ Shed ....... $8,800.00 36’X50’x10’ Horse Barn ......... $7,900.00 30’X60’x10’ Fully Enclosed ...... $7,800.00 30’X40’x10’ Fully Enclosed ...... $6,250.00 20’X60’x9’-7’ Cow Shed ....... $5,250.00


D TCONSTRUCTION


Doug Tincher


2 20 OKLAHOMA LIVING 0


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P.O. Box 795 Gore, Oklahoma 74435 • (918) 489-5764 OKLAHOMA LIVING


Congratulations to June’s winner, Linda Barnes!


June’s photo featured the Chickasaw Capitol building in Tishomingo, OK.


The photo was submitted by Carole Grigg. BUILDINGS


POST FRAME


COMPASSION Continued from Page 7


Since 1995, the free, fi ve-day-per-week, prima- ry-care clinic has provided medical, dental and optical care, pharmacy, mammogram screen- ings, medical and social service assessments and referrals. In 2011, GSCC introduced the Com- mitment to Life diabetic health program to as- sist its 80-percent-diabetic patient base. Of the available medical care and services, the fastest-rising expense is pharmaceutical costs. During the 2011 fiscal year, GSCC provided medical care to more than 4,000 patients and dispensed over 43,307 prescriptions during 6,718 patient appointments. Of those prescrip- tions, 19,387, almost 45 percent of them, were free.


Vanesa Ramsey, GSCC executive director, said “the suggested $4 per prescription donation barely touches medication costs.” She noted if a diabetic patient is on a restrict- ed income, the $400 to $500 per prescription cost for Lantus would be prohibitive. By provid- ing free medication, patients are ensured a ready supply of medication for achieving successful disease management.


Why would a skilled medical professional choose a free clinic over a private sector envi- ronment? One of GSCC’s nurse practitioners, Tasha Preston, made that choice.


“I am one of these people. My family used free clinics in Texas; my family always has. We did not always have access to health care and I was sick all the time,” Preston said.


Home remedies were the only medical care


they could afford and she was 12 before she had access to dental care.


“When I look at our patients, they look just like my family,” Preston said.


Preston emphasized that free clinics are a ne- cessity.


“These patients would not have anywhere else to go for health care. We are not just treating the common cold; we are treating life-threatening diseases like diabetes and Hepatitis C,” she said. Closing free clinics results in increased costs, affecting the price of medication and raising in- surance premiums; it also limits accessibility to health care and causes an escalating burden on emergency rooms, she added.


“There is such a shortage of doctors in Okla- homa that they are already overwhelmed and clinics are at full capacity. There is an imbalance between supply and demand in Oklahoma,” Preston said. A free health clinic fi lls a niche that will not disappear or be fi lled by other means. They do more than dispense medication, give a shot, or hand out an educational brochure. “Just like a spark can start a forest fi re,


a spark of hope can start a rebirth for our patients,” Ramsey noted. “We can’t fail these people. I’ve seen what hope can do for them and I believe in Okla- homa we can help to fan that spark of hope for our future generations.” For more information, please call 580-223-3411 or visit the GSCC website, www.gscca-


rdmore.com. OL


_______win $25_______ Guess Where!


Guess where this photo was taken and win a $25 gift certifi cate! If more than one person guesses the photo correctly, we will have a drawing to determine the winner.


To be eligible to win, you MUST “like” our Facebook page. Submit your guess by visit- ing www.ok-living.coop/submit. Deadline is July 10. One guess per person. Employees of OAEC, Oklahoma Living and OKRE&T Credit Union not eligible.


To enter a photo, visit www.ok-living.coop/ submit. If your photo is chosen for the con- test, you will win an Oklahoma Living travel mug!


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