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C A N A D I A N JULY 2012


V A L


ELECTRALITE Lavender farm is a growing attraction


SUPPLEMENT TO OKLAHOMA LIVING


Lucky and Debi Seaton have turned their Country Cottage Primitive Lavender Farm into an award winning attraction.


The farm, located in rural western Pot- tawatomie County, was a state agritourism award winner this year. It attracts thousands of visitors from large bus loads of people to mother-daughter outings. The Seatons do very little advertising and rely mostly on word of mouth to promote their farm. This year, about 3,600 people are expected to visit the farm which is served by Canadian Valley Electric Cooperative.


Their love for lavender began in 2001 while vacationing at their daughter and son- in-law’s home in Tacoma, Washington. They brought two lavender plants back to Oklahoma, and today have hundreds of different varieties growing behind their home.


Brook Manning, 15, of Choctaw gathers lavender at County Cottage Primitives Lavender Farm on a warm June day.


Debi said she initially planned to harvest the lavender to sell at shows and festivals. It wasn’t long before they realized people truly enjoyed visiting the fragrant fields and cutting


it themselves. A large bundle is only $7.50 Lucky, a full-time mason, designed and built the adorable yellow cottage that is too inviting to pass up. Inside is a gift shop stocked with one-of-a-kind items, many of which Lucky constructed in his workshop next door. His handcrafted furniture, shelves, birdhouses and other decorative items are among the most popular sellers. A menagerie of picture frames, lovely silk flower arrangements, lavender products and more line the shop. Customers are offered lav- ender lemonade to sip while they browse. The farm is as aesthetically beautiful and relaxing as the smell of lavender wafting in the breeze. The lavender field is scattered with statues, benches and an arbor. There also is a meditation garden, shaded in a small grove of trees with a trickling fountain to enhance the serenity of the surroundings. The lavender is generally harvested beginning in June, and depending on weather con- ditions extends throughout the summer until the first frost. Debi offers classes where more can be learned about lavender’s history and its many uses. Its fragrance is commonly used to promote relaxation, but it also can be incorporated into cooking and wines. Debi bakes delicious lavender cheese cake, cookies and bread to give her students a taste of how lavender can please the pallet.


During Medieval times the plant was used for medicinal purposes and is a natural heal- ing remedy for headaches, burns and repels insects too, Debi said. Debi and Lucky say their lavender farm has become a ministry. They’ve met people they never would have and shared their blessings from God. The farm is at 17206 Walker Road.


It’s open Mon.-Sat. 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. For more information or directions call 275-3238, 275-4350, or visit their Web- site at countrycottagelavender.com


L


E Y The power of human connections By George


Are you are just tired of hearing about how bad things are in our country and world? Have you quit listening to the national news each evening to see which of the world governments are closest to bankruptcy or what else is going wrong?


This article is intended to highlight another issue you likely don’t want to hear about. If there is anything in this nation of which we appear to have an ample supply, it is rules and regulations. Apparently we don’t have near enough as the different government agencies continue to crank them out as fast as people with computers can compose them. Congress may be in gridlock and unable to pass anything, but fear not, government bureau- cracies have stepped up by issuing rules and regulations that have the full force and effect of law. These people do not answer to the voters and have become the ruling elite. Now I turn to the specific problem and the


point. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has published proposed national stan- dards to limit carbon dioxide (CO2) emission from new fossil fuel-fired electric generating plants. These proposed Clean Air Act New Source Performance Standards will limit new fossil-fuel based electric generating plants to a CO2 emission rate that coal-fired generating plants with current available commercial tech- nology cannot meet. This effectively eliminates coal as a generating source for future power plants. Some existing natural gas generating plants cannot meet this new rule. While exist- ing generating plants are not included in this proposed new rule, this is likely a precursor to the regulation of existing plants. The EPA has committed to propose emission standards for modified and existing electric generating plants in the future and may use this process to accomplish that mission. The electric cooperatives through our


national organization, NRECA, believe the Clean Air Act was never intended to regulate CO2. This proposed regulation is an example of its inadequacy and the failure to recognize the importance of coal as America’s most abundant domestic fuel. NRECA argues the technology is not commercially available to meet the proposed standard. America’s electric cooperatives continue to support a compre- hensive energy and environmental policy that


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