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EUROPEANNEWS 07


yberport, a leading Germany- based consumer electronics retailer, has rolled out graphic electronic shelf labelling across its entire store estate from ZBD Displays. Originally launched as an online store in 2006, Cyberport has since expanded, opening shops in Leipzig, Dresden, and two in Berlin. A growing multichannel retailer, Cyberport operates its online service alongside a catalogue and telephone ordering hotline.


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ZBD has replaced Cyberport’s outdated paper labels with its epop 50 electronic shelf labels (ESLs) for all products. With the ESLs in place,


GERMAN RETAILER INSTALLS E-SIGNAGE


Cyberport’s integrated multichannel price changes enable 100% price accuracy between prices at the shelf, online and at checkout. “We wanted our pricing displays and promotional mechanisms to show our customers that we are a high-end electronics retailer, and the epops do this – they look much more professional than our previous paper labels,” said Torsten Liebig, Cyberport store operations manager. By freeing-up staff from handling paper labels, the system will also allow the retailer to concentrate on providing even better customer service. “With the amount of product information we can put on


an epop, the speed with which we can update this information and the costs and time we will save now, staff don’t need to constantly print and reprint labels,” added Liebig. “We will continue to roll-out ZBD’s epops as and when we open new Cyberport stores.”


HEMA SELECTS STAFF MANAGEMENT SUITE


HEMA, a leading European retailer with stores in the Netherlands, Belgium, Luxembourg, Germany and France, has selected RedPrairie’s hosted retail solutions for execution management, time & attendance (T&A) and workforce management (WFM).


HEMA, which employs


approximately 10,000 people, will implement T&A and WFM in its self-owned stores in Belgium and the Netherlands, while the execution management system will be used in all stores, including franchises. It will


also implement these solutions in their distribution centre. “After an extensive selection


process, RedPrairie was selected for its rich functionality in supporting all of our requirements, its advanced forecasting capabilities, the fact that it can be hosted and its user-friendliness,” said Friedeke Voss, IT manager at HEMA. “RedPrairie’s ability to handle complex labour standards also played an important role in our decision and we are confi dent that they will help us boost the effi ciency of our store staff and bottom line results.”


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Execution management will enable HEMA to ensure timely and consistent execution of corporately assigned tasks across all locations, thereby improving the results from merchandising programmes. WFM provides a set of tools to forecast and schedule labour resources and track performance. And T&A allows consistent application of national wage, hour and leave regulations, in accordance with union rules. HEMA wants to confi gure and update these in minutes, to get an accurate real-time administration of time, reduced payroll errors and better schedule compliance.


◆ German fashion retailer K&L Ruppert is achieving time, cost and space savings since purchasing 200 MB200i printers from Sato. It has improved the speed and effi ciency with which its staff can price, label and markdown goods in store. It is also using the printers in the internal fl ow of goods between the retailer’s stores and warehouses.


◆ French leather bags and accessories company Longchamp recently


commissioned SSI Schaefer to optimise its logistics centre in Segré, France. A tailor-made solution for the order picking and automation of customer shipments ensured optimal routes in the warehouse and ideal order picking processes.


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MARCH/APRIL 2012 RETAIL TECHNOLOGY


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