This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Montreux Jazz Festival


For two weeks each summer, hundreds of musical acts and 230,000 of their fans descend upon the sleepy town of Montreux, transforming it into a mecca for music lovers of all kind. Recently named “Best Festival in the World” by the International Live Music Conference in London, the Montreux Jazz Festival has welcomed icons such as Ella Fitzgerald, B.B. King, Johnny Cash and Bob Dylan since its founding in 1967.


The Lakeside Promenade of Montreux


Montreux takes full advantage of its picturesque setting along Lake Geneva. Whispering willow trees, vibrant beds of fl owers and the legendary statue of Freddy Mercury mingle with shops and cafés along eight miles of lovely lakeside strolling. Early evening is the ideal time for people watching and to see the setting sun framed by alpine peaks and the skyline of the Swiss Riviera.


Train du Chocolat


See the “Land of Chocolate” from the sweetest seat in town. From May to October, the panoramic car of Golden Pass Line’s Chocolate Train serves up coff ee and croissants as it transports visitors to Gruyère for a tour of its cheese dairy and castle, then to the Cailler Factory in Broc for the tour’s highlight — an authentic Swiss chocolate tasting.


Casino Barrière


Once host to celebrated musical acts such as Led Zeppelin and T e Rolling Stones, the Casino Barrière in Montreux was immortalized in Deep Purple’s rock ballad “Smoke on the Water,” aſt er being burned to the ground during a concert in 1971. Today the glitz and glamour of this bygone era can be relived in the extravagant establishment’s three restaurants, two bars and sprawling gaming fl oor.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124