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BAVARIA


Riesling Fact Sheet


• Is considered the “other” white wine • Has tremendous food pairing versatility


A lifestyle of hard work and white wine Lieba and Steinmetz both studied wine at vineyards


in the United States before returning to their home country to work. T ey said studying the techniques used by another country helped them understand a wider variety of growing practices, enabling them to producer higher quality wine in the Mosel region. When it comes to production time, Lieba said the


steep slopes make the work cumbersome. “When you have 20 people working in the vineyard


during the harvest time, there are always like three or four who are just carrying the grapes out,” he said. Steinmetz agrees that the work is hard at times.


Although there are steep slope machines used for cutting grass, the pruning and picking is done primarily by hand. “T ere’s enough to work the whole year from the


pruning to harvest,” she said. “It takes a long time. It’s a lot of work, especially on the slopes.” T e hard work eventually makes the product worth


it. Sitting in the chilled cellar at the Bergweiler estate, Lieba pours a glass and takes a sip before saying with a grin, “You can’t copy this taste of the vineyard.”


• Is categorized based on style (levels of dryness)


• Is categorized on the grape’s ripeness level at harvest (Kabinett, Spatlese, Auslese)


• Dry rieslings are called “Trocken” (“dry in German”) or “Halbtrocken” (“half-dry in German”)


• Is considered to be indigenous to Germany and has been planted in the Rhine and Mosel since the 14th century


• Is affected by where grown - California Rieslings tend to be dry and melony while German Rieslings are more tart and grapefruity in taste


• The quality of the vintage is directly related to weather and climate


ALPINE LIVING 2011 | 53


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