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SWISS ALPS


Above: Peter Lunn, frequent guest of the Hotel Eiger and avid snow skier. | Photo by Breanna Thackerson Left: Hotel Eiger guests get outstanding views of the region’s three peaks: the Eiger, the Mönch and the Jungfrau, as seen from a family suite in the hotel’s newly renovated property. | Photo by Kim Bissell


“The hotel is very good to me. This is my home here.” -Peter Lunn


Spanish. Corrine Jahn, who has worked at the hotel for several years, said guests usually choose to return to Hotel Eiger be- cause they feel at home there. Annelis said there was nowhere else in the world where trav-


elers could have such a view and have it seem so nearby. It’s very special, she said, in the fact that you have to take a train to get there. Aſt er a ride up the gondola, guests must venture by train to reach the fi nal, car-free destination of Hotel Eiger. T e seren- ity of it all is why many guests choose to take holiday in Mürren and while there, reside at Hotel Eiger. Serenity isn’t the only thing that keeps guests coming back,


famous Eiger mountain provides views of this immaculate peak on clear days. Annelis von Allmen-Staehli helps runs the hotel with her son, Adrian


Staehli and his wife, Susanna. Adrian took over management in 2007 and is part of the fourth generation to manage the hotel. T e family has been running the hotel for more than 100 years. “My parents owned the hotel and my father took the hotel over from


his uncle,” Annelis said. “It was my father’s uncle who built the hotel in 1891.” Annelis’ father’s passing when she was just 23 forced her to take over


the hotel sooner than expected. Growing up in the hotel, she knew all too well the dedication it was going to take to run it. “It’s not a job, it’s a way of life,” Annelis said. “If you really put your heart


into it and want to do it properly, sometimes, it’s really almost too much.” Hotel Eiger does not cater to those accustomed to chain hotels with


impersonal service. T e Stäehlis treat each guest like a member of their own family, including speaking in the guest’s native language whenever possible. Annelis speaks German, English, French, Italian and a bit of


90| ALPINE LIVING 2011


though. For Peter Lunn, great skiing is important to have along- side warm hospitality. “I’m a fanatic skier, and I was put on skis before I was two years old,” Lunn said. T ough he only skis short distances now, he skied in the In-


ferno, and extreme downhill race, until he was 90. A woman once told Lunn, who was a spymaster during the Cold War, that the mountains were obstructing her view from the Hotel Eiger. Lunn said he laughed and told the woman that the mountains were the view because the mountains are his view. T e Jungfrau region off ers bliss for many, right down to the personalized view. Guests staying at the Hotel Eiger can try the famous Inferno


run by taking the gondola at the south end of the village up to the Schilthorn station. T e Hotel Eiger off ers easy access to numer- ous ski runs, sledging runs, snowshoeing trails, and hiking trails. T e hotel has traditional-sized rooms as well as family-style suites, which can accommodate up to six people. Whether traveling in the winter or summer, the Hotel Eiger off ers superb service, a friendly atmosphere, and views that can not be beaten.


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