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NORTHERN GERMANY


mother’s brother and sister who had been in hiding since the war broke out. From that point on, the girls began to reestablish their lives. In July of 1946 they arrived by freighter in


Mobile, Ala., and took a train to connect with family members in Omaha, Neb. A few weeks later, the girls moved to Brooklyn, N.Y., and lived with another cousin while working in a glove factory, learning English at night. Both of the women married German-born


Jews in 1949. Siegler and her husband Walter had three children and seven grandchildren. Today, Siegler resides in Birmingham, Ala., in


the same house she has lived in since 1961. She works two days a week at a clothing store and works with the Circle of Life Knitting Society to knit blankets and scarves for newborns and cancer patients. Siegler is also currently fi nishing up a book


about her journey, My Father’s Blessing, which will be published this summer. Ann Mollengarden, education director at the


Birmingham Holocaust Education Center, has been working with Siegler to put together her book. “Ruth is a strong person, with a heart of gold,”


Mollengarden said. “Aſt er all that she had to experience, she remains the ultimate optimist. Perhaps it was optimism that helped her survive.” “Sometimes even she has a hard time


comprehending what she experienced,” Mollengarden said. “Almost like it happened to someone else. Over and over when we talked together she would repeat, ‘Can you imagine?’ Because in truth, we can’t imagine that one man could treat another in that way.” However, Mollengarden said Siegler is more


than her story. “She leſt that chapter of her life behind and


went on to live a full, productive life, always giving back to others and her community,” she said. “She is truly an amazing woman.” T e book is dedicated to Siegler’s children


and grandchildren, so that the suff ering she endured along with millions of others will never be forgotten. “My Father’s Blessing” is also dedicated to her


sister, for the love and appreciation she gave during the darkest of time of her life. “We helped each other,” she said. “Otherwise


we never could have made it if we wouldn’t have been together.”


26| ALPINE LIVING 2011


Top: Sinks in the bathhouse of Sachsenhausen were few. Every morning before roll call, prisoners crowded around the sinks. Some were even trampled and killed in the early morning chaos. Above: A memorial to all those who perished at Dachau concentration camp.


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