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SWISS ALPS


Tickets to the Top of Europe from Lauterbrunnen run 96 CHF for an adult to 48 CHF for a child


all ages. Every part [restaurant] has what they’re looking for.” Soche said T e Crystal’s three-course meal daily special is his


favorite. Guests start with a garlic cream soup and then are served the main course, grilled veal steak and new potatoes with green and white asparagus covered in a creamy hollandaise sauce. T en for dessert, the restaurant off ers caramelized vanilla cream, fresh strawberries, sherbet and powdered sugar dotting the plate in the shape of the Alps. Soche said with six restaurants and 60 employees, Gletscher-


Restaurants is a big company, and his experience helps him handle any challenge that comes his way. “If you miss [food shipments], you have to wait til the next day,”


Soche said. Lakshmi and Ram, a couple from India, enjoyed the breath-


taking view from the Sphinx during their fi rst visit to Europe. “It’s the most beautiful thing we’ve ever seen,” Lakshmi said.


“We’ve been blessed with sunshine today so we can see everything.” Susanna Stäehli, co-owner of Murren’s Hotel Eiger, said the


hotel off ers a screen in its lobby that shows the weather at the Top of Europe so visitors can see the diff ering weather patterns at the various altitudes. “It’s a good service for us and our customers,” Stäehli said. “It’s


quite important to our guests. A lot of people come just for [the Top of Europe], and they want to make sure it’s worth going up that day.” For Soche, he encouraged travelers to visit the Top of Europe


“to have the special feeling of being in the mountains.” “You’re really stuck in the glacier world, only coming up by


train, not walking or hiking,” he said. “You’re really in the middle of the world.”


ALPINE LIVING 2011 | 73


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