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BAVARIA


many modern amenities on the inside as it does enchanting features on the out- side.


“T e castle was once built to protect


pilgrims,” Koseck said. “Later it was a lodge and they invited their friends from all over Europe. So for three hundred years the only reason this place was run was to give people a warm welcome. It’s very easy to decide what to do with it now. T at is its original reason.” From the restaurant’s gourmet dishes


to the hand-blown rose wine glasses and artwork featured throughout the castle, Koseck has tried to remain focused on the region around his hotel to help the area thrive and maintain a sense of cul- ture and pride. Every few years, the castle is fi lled with new artwork, music and theatre performances honoring the fairy tale. Currently, the castle features the origi-


nal artwork of Alfons Holtgreve, whose paper cut-outs, metal works and sculp- tures tell the story of Sleeping Beauty and other popular fairy tales. A visit in the summer will ensure guests a view of the glorious rose garden and blooms scaling the castle walls. “T ese are just details, so if you don’t


care, you can just ignore it, but other people might look and say, ‘Wow, look at that,’” Koseck said. Besides the artwork, visitors can fi nd


custom tartan fabrics throughout the castle and


diff erent animal themes in


each bedroom. T e rooms are named for animals, instead of numbered, which dates back to the castle’s time as a hunt- ing lodge, when servant’s could not read well and used animals to identify each room. Koseck said the hotel’s constant evolu-


tion mirrors the nature of the fairy tales and the history of the castle. “T e thing about the Brothers Grimm


is that they never tried to tell the truth,” he said with a knowing smile. “Sleeping Beauty was published seven times, always diff erent. Wilhelm Grimm worked on it and made it better. T ose tales Wilhelm liked best are the ones most popular to- day. T e thing important to the Brothers


48| ALPINE LIVING 2011


Grimm is that the people have the fairy tale in their minds.” Koseck said this is what is disappoint-


ing about Disney versions of the stories, that the Brothers Grimm would not want one set image to portray their tales. “Fairy tales are imagination,” he said. “If you don’t get it in your heart, if you don’t feel it, you won’t get any fairy tale in your life — that’s what we believe.” Many residents of the fairy tale towns


and cities share Koseck’s view of staying inspired by fairy tales in one’s imagina- tion instead of believing they can only be one way. Aſt er all, the brothers did not write their stories, only related the tales from many cultures and places over the years. From Castle Hotel Sababurg, a trip just


minutes to the west through the primeval forest Reinhardswald will inspire visitors to search for the glowing eyes of a wolf lurking between the moss-draped trees,


or seek out a portal to the Elven world. T en they will emerge to fi nd Sababurg’s sister castle, Trendelburg, home of the fairy tale princess Rapunzel. Deiter Uff elmann, better known in


the region as Knight Dietrich, has been guarding Trendelburg and welcoming guests for what he claims is 700 years. “I am the bridge for the old time,” he said valiantly and brandished his sword. “T e prince is for the young girls. No, I am a knight. I am protecting this castle for 700 years, and I will be here for 300 more.” Like the Sleeping Beauty castle, Tren-


delburg has been transformed into an elegant hotel, and features performances of Rapunzel every summer and upon re- quest by tourist groups. Suits of armor, tapestries and centuries-


old furnishings make guests feel like they are a part of the fairy tale. Each room is unique in its décor, one room even boast- ing a bed from the 17th century.


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