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SWISS ALPS Lucerne


No trip to Switzerland would be complete without visiting this historic city.


1 If you choose to sightsee by foot, take a


walk along the waterfront across the Chapel Bridge. T e covered wooden footbridge was built in 1333 to help defend the city. While walking across the bridge, pay close attention to the 17th-century paintings on the roof. T ese paintings tell the story of the city’s history, and there are more than 100 of them.


Lucerne has many great art museums, including the Lucerne Museum of Art, the fourth-largest art museum in Switzerland. For Picasso lovers, two museums are within walking distance of one another. One is the Rosengart Collection pictured below and the other is the Picasso Museum, where the majority of the pieces are Picasso originals. For history buff s, the Swiss Transport Museum has more than 3,000 displays that reveal the


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and history of transportation Switzerland.


84| ALPINE LIVING 2011


advances in


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Another can’t-miss attraction is the famous Dying Lion Monument by sculptor Bertel T orvaldsen. T is monument commemorates the Swiss guards that died during the French Revolution. Author Mark Twain called it “the most mournful and moving piece of stone in the world.”


4 Aſt er a day of sightseeing and


relaxing along the waterfront, visit MARILYN, a café, lounge and bar dedicated to all things Marilyn Monroe. Every bit of the venue is covered in photographs and other memorabilia of the star.


The historic city of Lucerne has something to offer for travelers of all interests. Even if you can only pass through the city, don’t miss the opportunity to take in the relaxed atmosphere and beautiful scenery.


Story by Katherine Martin Photos by Alden Jones


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