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Editor’s Note E


EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Chris Jackson


MANAGING EDITOR Allyson Angle


ART DIRECTOR Emily Johnson


ASSISTANT ART DIRECTOR Brandee Easter


PHOTO DIRECTOR Alison Smith


ASSISTANT PHOTO DIRECTOR Alden Jones


WEB/MULTIMEDIA EDITOR Katie Wood


GRAPHICS EDITOR Sarah Taylor


very traveler is diff erent. Some feel their time is being wasted unless it is completely fi lled with sightseeing. T ey keep a running tally of everywhere they’ve been and see the world through the viewfi nder of a camera.


T ere is no bad way to see Europe. It is a fascinatingly beautiful and historic place. How-


ever, I would encourage you to see it diff erently from the travelers I’ve described. T eir methods are more appropriate for vacationing in the United States, since it’s a hustle and bustle kind of country. Life in Europe moves at a diff erent pace. Europeans enjoy their leisure. Most workers


are allowed six weeks of vacation per year, and “lunch hours” are more like an hour and a half. I would encourage you to adopt this lifestyle for the duration of your trip. An every- day conversation with your friends and family is even more enjoyable within the friendly confi nes of a German beer garden or in the midst of a Swiss mountain view. Take it in. Absorb it. You don’t have to go out and fi nd the novelty of Europe. It surrounds you at all times. Talk to locals whenever you can. It could be the staff of your hotel or a fellow patron of


an art museum. T ey may give interesting suggestions of where to go and what to see in your free time. A conversation with a stranger could change your worldview. Maybe you’ll even shape their perception of Americans for the better. T e people of Europe are some of the friendliest I’ve ever met, which goes against many


of the stereotypes we Americans have created about Europeans. If you stand around look- ing confused for a minute, as I found myself doing quite oſt en, someone will probably stop what they are doing and ask if they can help you. Of all the incredible assets Europe has to off er, its people are the greatest. When traveling through Europe, or any foreign place for that matter, tap into your


humanity. Learn as much about yourself and those around you as you can. Immerse yourself in the customs and lifestyles of the land. If only for a short while, you are part of that place.


Chris Jackson, s J editor-in-chief of Alpine Living 2011 4| ALPINE LIVING 2011


CHIEF COPY EDITOR Jena Hippensteel


NORTHERN GERMANY SECTION EDITOR Brian Anderson


BAVARIA SECTION EDITOR Katie Wood


SWISS ALPS SECTION EDITOR Ashley Johnson


FRENCH SWITZERLAND SECTION EDITOR Pamela Harris


Brooke Carbo Lindsey Holland Katherine Martin Jordan Staggs


WRITERS


PHOTOGRAPHERS Megan Smith Breanna Thackerson Emma Bissell Kailey Bissell


ADVISER Kim Bissell


ON THE WEB alpineliving.ua.edu


Alpine Living is produced every other year by students in International


Journalism — JN 492/JN 561. Check out the University of Alabama’s


Journalism Department at jn.ua.edu.


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