This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
FRENCH SWITZERLAND Switzerland’s Mound of Story by Katherine Martin


at ancient history to an exploration of contemporary art. With so many choices, anyone who visits the country should have no problem fi nding a small gallery to pop into or a large museum with fl oor aſt er fl oor of art and artifacts.


S The Rosengart Collection


T is museum in Lucerne is housed in what was once the headquarters of the Swiss National Bank. It includes more than 200 works by 23 diff erent “classic modernist” artists. T e works include 125 by Paul


100| ALPINE LIVING 2011


witzerland has more than 900 museums


that off er visitors anything from a look


Klee, some 50 Picasso originals, and others by Cézanne, Chagall, Kandinsky, Matisse and Seurat to name a few. T e museum also gives visitors a glimpse into the later years of Picasso through photographs by David Douglas Duncan, a famous 20th- century war photographer.


Musée International de la Croix-Rouge et du Croissant-Rouge


“Everyone is responsible to everyone for everything.” T ese words by author Fyodor Dostoyevsky greet visitors and set


principle of the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Museum in Geneva, the birthplace of the Red Cross. T e eleven areas of the museum illustrate and explain


the


the principles, history and work of the Red Cross and Red Crescent through up-to- date illustrations, sculptures, artifacts and original photographs and fi lm.


The Olympic Museum Lausanne


Visitors may ask why there is a museum dedicated to everything Olympics in a hilly city on the banks of Lake Geneva. T e answer? Lausanne is home to the International Olympic Committee that organizes the summer and winter games. T e Olympic Museum traces the history of the Olympic games from the ancient Greeks to the addition of the winter games through posters, fi lms, clothing and even Olympic torches.


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