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SWISS ALPS


Tasty pastries can be found in the local bakeries. They can make a quick break- fast. | Photo by Alden Jones


BUDGET DINING


in the Swiss Alps Story by Katie Wood


It is no secret that Switzerland is an expensive country, especially against the U.S. dollar, so fi nding food in the Swiss Alps that doesn’t break the bank is oſt en easier said than done. Here is a list of helpful tips to remember when looking for good deals on your meals.


Fresh fruits purchased at a local market make a tasty healthy snack during your travels. | Photo by Alden Jones


Fill up on breakfast If you are vacationing in the Swiss Alps, it is a good idea to fi ll up on breakfast, whether it’s at your ho- tel, hostel or bakery down the street. Eating a hearty breakfast in the morning will give you the energy you will need to climb mountains, ski or just sit and enjoy the views. Filling up will also mean that you may not need a full lunch and could get by with a small snack in the aſt ernoon from a local vender.


When in Europe be sure to get a cup of


espresso cof- fee with your breakfast. | Photo by Katie Wood


Ask for the special Most restaurants will have a special of the day served at lunch and dinner that includes multiple courses with a soup, salad, entrée and dessert. T e daily special is a great way to get fi lled up and will stretch your dollar. Look for the special of the day on menus posted outside the restaurant or hotel.


Find the local COOP T e Coop is a popular grocery chain in Switzerland. It is not only a great place to stock up on all your Swiss chocolate, but a perfect place to fi nd meals for less. Grab a fresh croissant, some cheese and a bottle of wine and share a picnic outside for under 10 franc. Not only are you saving money, but you can eat like the locals and enjoy the breathtaking views. Obviously this isn’t something you need to do for every meal; you are in Swit- zerland aſt er all.


Splitting a pizza is a great way to keep your budget in check. | Photo by Katie Wood


Split a pizza Locals say you can’t go wrong by splitting a piz- za and having a glass of wine. Switzerland borders countries known for their culinary genius, meaning you can split an authentic Italian pizza and a glass of wine for about 15 franc. It doesn’t get much bet- ter than that.


Order the fresh water T e water in Switzerland is some of the cleanest, freshest water in the world. Even though it may be considered rude to order water from the tap in some European coun- tries, that is not the case in Switzerland. Swiss water comes straight off the mountains, and the Swiss are happy to remind you of its freshness. Most restaurants will automatically bring out a pitcher for the table to share, but if not, you can enjoy it for free just by asking for the tap. Save yourself a couple of dollars by enjoying one of Swit- zerland’s natural resources for free. Or refi ll a water bottle at any one of the water troughs you see in town — yes, you CAN drink it.


74| ALPINE LIVING 2011


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