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NORTHERN GERMANY’S HOT SPOTS


Brandenburg Gate An iconic symbol of German


urg


and commissioned by Prussian King Frederick William II as a peace off ering to Germany. Restored in the early 2000s from damage received during WWII, the gate is located close to the Reichstag, where the German parliament meets.


rom dama ceiv d du g Mitte district


Mitte distr Mitte, mean g “


ists..


itte, meaning “middle,” is the cultural and historical hub of Berlin. T is area, known for it’s bohemian fl air and art scene, is brim Eastern E artists


ean spirit into art. T e store sells interesting t-shirts and street wear, and hosts events for local Holocaust Memorial


Also situated in Mitte is the Holocaust Memorial, which was designed by architect Peter Eisenman. T e memorial takes an uncommon approach to remembering the Murdered Jews of Europe. 2,711 unmarked stones stand on sloping land representing those who perished. Each stone is a diff erent size. Many have compared the rectangular standing stones to coffi ns to demonstrate the atrocities of the Holocaust, while Eisenman said the confusing atmosphere represents the confusion Jews faced during the Holocaust, according to his project text.


H A


o t


The Topography of Terror


T is museum is located on the old stomping grounds of the S.S. and Gestapo. Niederkirchnerstrasse is a street formerly known for housing the offi ces of the Nazi and Communist regimes. It was bombed and destroyed in 1945 by WWII Allied forces.


ne, is brimming with museums and street artists. Redspective, one particular store, specializes in mixing n European s


any, this famous gate was constructed from 1788 to 1791 in Berlin by Carl Gotthard Langhans si


Potsdamer Platz


Located in the center of Berlin, this public square has gone through a series of developments, bombings and busts. It endured destruction during WWII and abandonment during the Cold War and has become the busiest traffi c intersection in Europe. T e area houses many bars and restaurants.


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