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CO - OP LIVI NG


Local director of Safety & Loss Control receives national honor


By Kathy Holsonbake


t’s been a lifetime of human connections for Oklahoma Association of Electric Coopera- tives (OAEC) Director of Loss Control – New Mexico, Norman McDugle. Now, that lifetime of service, safety and compassion has been recognized on a national level.


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The Herman C. Potthast Award is presented annu- ally during the National Utility Training and Safety Education Association (NUTSEA) meeting. A com- mittee of colleagues and peers chose Norman above many other candidates because he best emulated the qualities of dedication, leadership, cooperation and service exemplifi ed by the H.C. Potthast award. Only one other Oklahoma job training or safety instructor has claimed the honor since the inception of the award in 1972.


Norman began his career of service when his parents owned the Skedee, Okla. telephone exchange. On-the-job training climbing poles at the age of 12 allowed Norman to learn early the importance of safety. His rural electric cooperative life started in 1961 as a contracted journeyman lineman for Indian Electric Cooperative in Cleve-


ma and New Mexico since then.


Through the years, Norman’s quiet faithfulness to safety and the men and women who provide power to electric co-op members has not only earned him the respect of his peers, supervisors and members alike, but it has undoubtedly saved lives.


The Potthast award committee is made up of past recipients who determine if applicants represent the philosophy and ideals of H.C. Potthast. These ideals


are: ✓ Respect of fellow workers ✓ Inspiration of respect in subordinates ✓ Confi dence of supervisors/bosses ✓ Good technical understanding of the job ✓ Participation in community affairs outside the job


His service doesn’t end once he’s off the


clock. Norman has served on the Cleveland Area Hospital board of directors, as an or- dained deacon in his church and served on the board of the Baptist Village Administra- tive Committee in his hometown of Cleve- land.


Norman McDugle


land, Okla. His career at Indian Electric continued as district foreman at the Morrison offi ce from 1970 to 1980. After creating and eventually selling a suc- cessful electrical contract business, Norman returned to the cooperative family as a Safety and Loss Control Specialist at OAEC in 1995. In 2000, he was named Director of Loss Control, New Mexico. He has taught transformer, meter and climbing schools in Oklaho-


“Norman is the reason people like me choose a lifetime career as a lineman. He’s, no doubt, the reason many linemen are safe and sane on their jobs. He was a lineman for 13 years and then served on the board of In- dian Electric,” said Mark McMakin, OAEC Loss Control Specialist in New Mexico. “I doubt there is anyone who knows more or cares more about what we do.”


For the next year, Norman will also serve as the chairman of NUTSEA. OL


Norman McDugle began his career in the rural electric cooperative fi eld as a contracted jour- neyman lineman for Indian Electric Cooperative in 1961. Courtesy Photo


The Joy of Giving Back


Public Relations-Member Relations (PR-MR) Association—comprised of members from the Oklahoma Association of Electric Coopera- tives—donates toys to OU’s Children’s Hospital during a Fall Confer- ence in October.


2010-2011 President Bryce Hooper generated the idea that has now become an ongoing tradition of giving back to the community. This is the third time the Association has donated toys to help children in their recovery efforts.


From Left to Right: Kris Williams, Ozarks Electric (PR-MR Member); Barbara Miller, People’s Electric (PR-MR Secretary-Treasurer); Billie Been, East Central Electric (PR-MR Member); Bryce Hooper, Cotton Electric (PR-MR President); Paula Lanni, Verdigris Valley Electric (PR- MR Vice-President). Photo by Jennifer Dempsey/OAEC


NOVEMBER 2011 5


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