This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
CL AS S NO TE S CREATIVE THOUGHT Read(h)ership survey W


hile the digital age has introduced new ways of getting information, the good ol’


paper magazine remains a fixture of contemporary life. In fact, Angela Beddoe ’86, president and CEO of Beddoe Publishing and editor of Herlife magazine in New York State, cites studies that indicate magazine readership is on the rise. Herlife of New York, a monthly serving the


Capital/Adirondack region, was first published in March. Beddoe says its goal is to keep wo men throughout the region connected by highlighting those making a dif- ference in their homes, business- es, and communi- ties; it also offers a range of health, beauty, and life -


style stories. Recent covers have featured News - Channel 13 (Albany) co-anchor Benita Zahn and Saratoga Performing Arts Center executive direc- tor Marcia White. Herlife Magazine LLC, based in Kansas, pub-


lishes a Kansas City edition, with franchises in Denver, South Florida, Milwaukee, the Twin Cities, and California's Central Valley. As Beddoe told the Business Review, “I love magazines, and I didn’t want to reinvent the wheel. I knew I wanted to focus on women and the dialogue we have, every- thing from ‘Where do you do your investing?’ to ‘Where do you get your eyebrows done?’” Beddoe says her publication has been well re -


ceived, and she may bring the Herlife brand to New York City, Long Island, and even other states. The magazine is available for free in supermar- kets, coffee shops, doctors’ offices, and salons; it’s also online at herlifemagazine.com/albany. A government major and former VP of public


affairs for Energy East Management Corporation, Beddoe went on to found GreenForce Energy Systems, which partners with communities, insti- tutions, and businesses to realize sustainable energy goals. Besides Herlife and GreenForce, she is also starting a TV and film production company. With several irons in the fire, Beddoe says a liberal arts education “fosters your creativity and pre- pares you to embrace all opportunities that come your way. That’s what I do.” —MTS


Josh Margolis, and Rich Tressen was joined by psychology professor Sheldon Solomon, Sam Solomon ’12, Dan Wolff, and Adam Witt. It was a musical tour de force! Of course, we owe thanks to Marc Travis and his colleagues at Desperate Annie’s for the late-night hospitality we have all come to know, love, and, well, expect. Funny how an hour or two at DA’s makes you feel like you are back in college again. Reunion chair Cliff Nelson says he’s grateful to “the 115 classmates who joined us for Reunion—there is no doubt the turnout is what made it so much fun!” Ellen Hermann, who led our successful


class gift initiative, loved seeing so many classmates at Reunion. She enjoyed the softball game and time at the Parting Glass, DA’s (Johnny and Rock still going strong!), and Gaffney’s. She especially liked the party on Saturday night and “the fabulous band.” Ellen was delighted to see freshman roommate Lauren Sexeny and loved catching up with me, Jane Zoidis Quinn, Claire Bloch, Marc Travis, Ian Selig, Greg Demirjian, Ted West, Buff Barry, and members of the old Dogwood-A gang. She missed Lisa Rhodes O’Brien. Ellen thanks everyone who worked on making Reunion happen as well as everyone who came to party! Jane Zoidis Quinn says, “What a ball!


Everyone looked great and seemed so happy to be together!” Caroline Ralph Kenyon adds, “It was a fun weekend, with a great turnout by our classmates. The weather was great, campus looks terrific, and Saratoga is bustling.” She hopes one of her kids de - cides to at tend Skidmore. Caroline was happy to connect with Katie Trotta Kane and Paula Kurata Kuespert. “Meeting Paula’s 13-month-old was definitely a highlight!” Herb Eidt was “amazed” to see the number of people who came back for Re - union and says, “It made for a very spe- cial weekend.” Loren Greiff admits she had been “skep- tical, nearly resistant” about attending our 25th. “But now, to tell you that I had an absolute blast would hardly capture the spirit and unforced perfection of the week- end. I loved seeing classmates and recon- necting with so many friends. Thank you, Class of 86! See you at our 30th.” Terence Robinson works for Versabar Inc., a New Orleans-based international company that manufactures heavy equip- ment for the oil and gas industry. The company expanded operations to Hous - ton in 2005 in the aftermath of Hurricane


54 SCOPE FALL 2011


Katrina. Two of its largest pieces of equip- ment are used to pick up oil rigs, debris, and platforms off the floor of the Gulf of Mexico and around the world. Terence is responsible for seven intercompany or - ganizations that handle film production, underwater cabling, and real property holdings. Author and illustrator Tad Hills has turned his New York Times-bestselling chil- dren’s book, How Rocket Learned to Read, into an iPad app—with a little help from his Skidmore friends. The book was pub- lished in 2010 by Schwartz & Wade, an editing group within Random House Children’s Books headed by Tad’s wife, Lee Wade ’81. His brother Jonathan Hills ’97, founder and CEO of Brooklyn- based ad agency Domani Studios, devel- oped it into a digital app featuring anima- tions and reading games, with sound de - sign created by Bill Chesley ’85 at his company Henryboy in NYC. Linda Leon - ard ’96, director of new-media marketing at Random House, worked to promote the app, which was launched on iTunes in January. I am proud to be a member of this great


class and look forward to the next time we can all be together. ANNE CHORSKE STUZIN 206 RIDGEWOOD ROAD BALTIMORE, MD 21210-2539 ANNE@STUZIN.COM


the Beaver Creek (CO) Ski & Snow board School for 22 years and is in her sixth year as training man ager. In her two months off each year, she travels or stays in Ver mont with family. She has been doing “powder 8” competitions for sever- al years and earned the world-champi- onship title in 2009. More recently she competed in the open division at nation- als in Aspen, CO, doing well but not mak- ing the po dium. She says it was nice run- ning into Ceci Zak McGuire and me at her hotel. She encourages classmates heading out west to look her up. Amy Shore is education coordinator


’87 MAY 31–JUNE 3


for the Gladney Center for Adoption in Hous ton, TX. Daughter Miranda is a freshman at Tulane University. In July, Amy and Miranda went on a service trip to Guatemala to work in orphanages. Tara Greco is marketing director for KidsCOOK Productions, which launched an interactive cooking show for teens


Stacey Gerrish has been with


AT WORK


JILL RICHARDSON


R


E


O


U


N ‘12


I


N


R


E


U


O


N


I


N


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72