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WHAT’S THE FIRST NEWSPAPER SECTION YOU LIKE TO READ? The advice column.


CAN PRINT MEDIA SURVIVE? Nothing beats the physical sensation of holding a book and turning pages, or working on a cross- word with a pencil.


DANTE PETRI ’08 Environmental studies major Technical editor, URS Corp. en- gineering/construction firm; former newspaper reporter and fishing-lodge caretaker Anchorage, Alaska


WHAT DREW YOU TO THE NEWS? SkidNews was the launch and early driver of my time at Skidmore. The editors saw po- tential in me and asked me to write. They shaped the rest of my college career as well as my life.


DID YOU PLAN A JOURNALISM CAREER? I did, and a home-


town publisher advised me that journalism


school taught you to dot I’s and cross T’s and that a well- rounded liberal arts education offered more breadth.


DID YOUR NEWSWORK AND ACADEMICS INTERSECT? On Sunday nights the editorial staff would talk about anything from global politics to music, then write a concise essay on that topic. Monday we doled out stories. Tuesday we wrapped up the edit- ing and started layout. Wednesday it was common to be in the newsroom past 2 a.m. Thursday was theoretically the day off, though often I would find myself in the newsroom. Thursday through Saturday were the only days to focus on class work. I was more fully engaged in the process of running a News sec- tion than in most of my classes.


HOW DID YOUR NEWSWORK INFLUENCE LIFE AFTER GRADUATION? At for the SkidNews I was once accused of misquoting someone, and that led me to buy a digital voice recorder. After that, I could respond with more than just my word against theirs.


YASHODA SHARMA ’95 Biology and women’s studies major; PhD, molecular biology, University of Iowa


Project manager, Inflammatory Bowel Disease Genetics Consortium, Yale School of Medicine New Haven, Conn.


WHAT DREW YOU TO THE NEWS? I came to Skidmore as an introvert. My first two years were focused on my major and a few friends, and I was ex- tremely unhappy. But in my junior year I got involved with the Student Government Association and other groups, and my grades improved, my self-esteem shot up, and I had a lot more fun. In my senior year I took on the editor role to expand my nonscience skills and interests.


HOW DID YOUR NEWSWORK INFLU- ENCE LIFE AFTER GRADUATION? My primary focus was managing the


staff and the assignments and interacting with various groups, which was stimulating, frustrating, and inspiring. This experi- ence completely transformed me as an individual.


DID YOUR NEWSWORK AND ACADEMICS INTERSECT? The knowl- edge I gained from academics introduced me to my career op- tions. The confidence I gained with the News, SGA, and other groups gave me the courage to pursue my career, and to modi- fy it to better suit my personality and other skills and strengths.


WHAT’S THE FIRST NEWSPAPER SECTION YOU LIKE TO READ? Sorry to say, none. I don’t have time.


CAN PRINT MEDIA SURVIVE? Print is a waste of money and re- sources. Electronic is definitely more cost- and time-efficient, for producers and consumers.


JENS OHLIN ’96 Philosophy major; MA, MPhil, PhD, philosophy, Columbia Uni- versity; JD, Columbia Law


Associate professor, Cornell Law School Saratoga Springs and Ithaca, N.Y.


WHAT DREW YOU TO THE NEWS? The power and responsibility of a campus newspaper. I saw the need for a fourth estate separate from student govern- ment, faculty governance, and college administration.


WAS THE NEWSINDEPENDENT? Good journalism should keep those in power a bit off balance. We didn’t let anyone review copy before publication.


20 SCOPE FALL 2011


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