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Summer benefits shine


8


CLUB CONNECTION: NEW YORK CITY


SCOTT STEWART AND DEDICATION WIN THE $10,000 HUNTER DERBY AT THE SKIDMORE SARATOGA CLASSIC.


Hundreds of riders, trainers, owners, and spectators—including many alumni— turned out for the Skidmore College Sara - toga Classic Horse Show. This summer the two-week national “AA” sanctioned event featured a new $25,000 Rolex/USEF grand prix in show jumping, a $10,000 jumper classic, and a $10,000 USHJA international hunter derby. Proceeds from the horse show support scholarship awards for Skidmore students—nearly $3 million to date. The “Polo by Twilight” gala added about $200,000 to the Palamountain Scholarship Fund, which aids nearly 20 students each year. More than 500 guests enjoyed sunny skies, gourmet food, high-goal polo, and lively auctions—front-row, finish-line boxes at Saratoga Race Course inspired big bid- ding, as did a share in a West Point Thor- oughbreds racehorse won by Ken Freirich ’90 and a week at Disney World claimed by Mary Lou Whitney and John Hendrickson. Skidmore’s seventh annual Thorough- bred Cup in June drew 115 golfers and 25 tennis players. With more than a dozen sponsors, the Friends of Skidmore Athletics event raised over $30,000. Steve Cornell ’81 won the Outstanding Service Award, and athletics staff member Megan Buchanan was named MVP. The winning golf four- some was Fran Murray ’05, Reed Juckett ’06, Bill Trainor ’05, and Mike Stiller ’06. Tennis winners were Peter Sharpe and Christine Gale ’04. —SR


30 SCOPE FALL 2011


Floating party: More than 100 alumni, from the classes of ’79 through ’12, gathered in June for happy hour at the Pier 66/Frying Pan bar and restaurant


in Manhattan. They ate, drank, and mingled in a reserved section as the sun set over the Hudson River.


The venue is situated on a ship and barge docked on the Hudson. The Fry-


ing Pan is a historic lightship that was abandoned and sank in Chesapeake Bay, remaining underwater for three years before being raised and restored. In 1989 the rebuilt ship sailed to New York City, where it now sits beside Mari - time, a former railroad barge that still hosts a caboose.


“I certainly enjoy the opportunity to attend club events like theater or music performances, or programs like wine tastings,” says participant Vicki Tisch ’94. “But the free-form happy hour events are my favorites. Seeing old Skid- more friends and making new ones—just getting together with fellow grads in a relaxed, social atmosphere—can’t be beat!”—PD


Business mentors welcome “Serial entrepreneur” Ken Freirich ’90


u


has launched an annual business-plan competition (see skidmore.edu/bizcom - petition) to help Skidmore students build their own businesses. If you’re an alum with start-up savvy to share, apply now to advise a student in the upcoming 2011–12 contest, e-mail Prof. Roy Rotheim, rrotheim@skidmore.edu, to learn more.


JAMES LESLIE PARKER


CHARLIE SAMUELS


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