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CL AS S NO TE S CREATIVE THOUGHT Urban inspiration R


oberta Brandes Gratz ’62 majored in gov- ernment at Skidmore, but critical seeds of


her career as a journalist, urban critic, and policy- maker were sown in the English department. “I remember an English literature class that


was very provocative, because we delved very deeply into the books that we were reading,” she says. “One was Compulsion by Ira Levin—about the Leopold and Loeb murder case. I was fasci- nated by it and wrote a paper, really trying to get an understanding of the case. The Compulsion paper was a logical lead-in to my later work as a reporter for the New York Post.” Her heart


has always be - longed to New York City, and after her sopho- more year at Skid more, Gratz transferred to New York Uni - versity, “right back to Green - wich Village, where I was born,” she


notes. She earned a BA there in 1963. Her sub- sequent award-winning stint at the Post led to authorship of The Living City: Thinking Small in a Big Way (1994), and Cities Back from the Edge: New Life for Downtown (1998). She served on the NYC Landmarks Preservation Commission from 2003 to 2010 and has been on the Advi - sory Board of the Office of Long-Term Planning and Sustainability since 2010. Gratz’s latest book, published in March, is The


Battle for Gotham: New York in the Shadow of Robert Moses and Jane Jacobs. The book con- trasts the legacies of city planner Moses, “mas- ter builder” of massive developments in metro- politan New York, and Jacobs, champion of diverse, “human-scaled” neighborhood projects. While her tenure at Skidmore was relatively brief, it was also formative, Gratz says, and led to an early insight about the path her life work would take. “I discovered that my interest was really in how governments work. That evolved, later, into an interest in how cities work.” —Jim Akin ’84


visiting Paris to contact her at pierre-gos- set2@wanadoo.fr. Zelda Schwartz, who felt “pampered by


the College and connected with so many classmates,” says her only regret is that “we all had to part, and we live so far away from each other.” Joan Horowitz Behr thanks everyone who returned to Skidmore and “made my 50th so special.” She adds, “Here’s to our 55th in 2016!”


I’ve agreed to stay on the job for another five years as class secretary, so long as you continue to write me! Class co-presidents Judy Tulchin and Pam Leighton are stepping down, and Zelda Schwartz gra- ciously agreed to serve as president. One of my happiest reunion memories is, while buying a new navy Skidmore sweat- shirt in the bookstore, I spotted Joan Braffet modeling and purchasing a green one! I had a special visit two weeks after Reunion: I delivered the class champagne glass to Daryl Evans Platt, with whom I had lunch in Annapolis, MD. She was de - lighted to be remembered by all of us at Reunion. CHARLOTTE SMILEY READ 6330 GOLF COURSE SQUARE ALEXANDRIA, VA 22307-1225 GIG4SMILE@AOL.COM


career as a certified financial planner and investment advisor to become a full-time vocalist, singing jazz standards and


’62


Ellie Rachlin left a 30-year


MAY 31–JUNE 3


international favorites—in French, Italian, and Spanish. The only remnant of her old life, she quips, is her fondness for the Louis Armstrong tune “I’m in the Market for You.” On Bastille Day, July 14, she per- formed an all-French program at the Rhine cliff (NY) Hotel. She often performs with her husband, John Halsey (Williams ’59), a former professor of philosophy and now a full-time jazz pianist. She stays in touch with Stephanie Lindsey King, who lives nearby in Highland, NY, and Jackie Merriam Paskow, who lives in Canada. Ellie plans to attend our 50th reunion. In May Lynn Garrett Meyer and George


took a three-week trip to Turkey with Overseas Adventure Travel. Lynn enjoyed the tour guide’s expert commentary and appreciated his help finding information on her great-great-grandparents, who were missionaries in eastern Turkish city of Erzurum in the 1840s. The Meyers’ daughter Liz and her family moved to


42 SCOPE FALL 2011


Atascadero, CA, where she will be on the faculty of Cal Polytechnic. Lynn is very excited to have her—and grandson Car - tier, age 1—nearby. While traveling to Germany for a Friendship Force Interna - tional conference in August, the Meyers visited friends and made a swing up to Oslo, Norway, to visit Lynn’s “little sister” Susan Gibbs ’65. Lynn is looking forward to Reunion. In June Stephanie Lindsey King also enjoyed an Overseas Adventure Travel trip to Turkey, accompanied by the same tour guide who led the Meyers’ trip. “He taught us more than we could possibly absorb on our 16-day journey.” Stephanie is also looking forward to our 50th but laments, “We can’t be that old!” Sue Vanek Heidtmann celebrated her birthday in April by traveling to Florida and flying the P-15 Mustang WWII fight- er, with instructor Lee Lauterback, who has more hours in P-15s than any other pilot. Blue Angels, move over! Thanks to ground and on-plane cameras, Sue sent DVDs of the flight—which included bar- rel rolls and other aerial stunts—to her five grandkids. Her granddaughter gradu- ated from college in May, and two grand- sons are college freshmen. Sue works in nursing for two insurance companies. Her youngest daughter, carrying on the nurs- ing tradition, heads up the orthopedic units at two Massachusetts hospitals and is a Joint Commission surveyor. Sue looks forward to Reunion and says, “It’s hard to believe it is going to be 50 years!” Lynn Rand Smart and John left their Bonita Bay, FL, home in time to be on Cape Cod for the opening day of ladies golf on May 17. They welcomed their newest grandson (their fourth) in March. In June the couple enjoyed a 10-day trip to Switzerland, France, and Germany, traveling via plane, train, and riverboat. Lynn enjoys pastel painting and belongs to art leagues in Florida and on the Cape. She will attend our 50th. Twila Fleckten Wolfe’s latest travels


took her to Egypt, Jordan, and Syria, where she and her sister toured with a small group for almost a month. Twila says they were grateful for this amazing experience and were able to depart shortly before the uprisings took place. She is on “leave of absence” from her tennis team while rehabbing from knee replacement surgery. Twila (twila@montana.com) would like to connect with classmates who might be out near Missoula, MT. Carolyn Heft was on the planning com- mittee for her 45th Columbia Law School reunion, which she attended in June. Last


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