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THE VERY FIRST SKIDMORE NEWS hit campus on October 9, 1925. Today it’s still going strong both in print and online. For many SkidNews staffers over the decades, working on the paper was a “peak experience,” like summer research, study abroad, or other life-shaping college endeavors. A former editor remembers spending 35–40 hours a week on the paper. Another says the peer mentoring of older students on the News staff got him “dialed in” to investigative research even more than some of his classes did. One staffer found it “stimulating and inspiring” to share the


newsroom with “smart, spectacular people who took themselves and their work seriously.” And a shy science student was “com- pletely transformed as an individual” by the leadership experience of managing the News. Where are they now? All over: they’re doctors and lawyers, de-


signers and marketers, land conservation leaders, banking ana- lysts, and, yes, journalists. Below, Scope turns the tables on a few of them, interviewing the former interviewers. (For their full an- swers, go to scopedish.wordpress.com.)


JUSTIN GRAEBER ’02 English major Editor-in-chief, Duxbury Clipper


Quincy, Mass.


WHAT DREW YOU TO THE NEWS? Newsroom cul- ture. We were authority- questioning punks who loved stirring the pot and tugging on the adminis- tration's cape.


DID YOU PLAN A JOURNALISM CAREER? I worked for a theater and freelanced to make extra cash. I got burned out backstage and started doing more writing, and that blossomed into my career. I had thought it would be the other way around. I learned that I hated sleep and liked getting yelled at by sources enough to do it professionally.


DID THE NEWS AFFECT CAMPUS LIFE?We covered a harassment incident just before Parents’ Weekend, and an administrator removed all the papers, thinking it would protect them from embarrassment. Students got upset, the campus rallied behind us, and we were able to kick-start dual conversations about censorship and tolerance.


WHAT WOULD YOU ADVISE A JOURNALISM STUDENT? Always get two sources, fact-check everything, don’t accept the press release, and never stop digging for truth.


CAN PRINT MEDIA SURVIVE? When we say “print media,” we're usually referring more to the type of writing than the paper it's printed on. Comprehensive beat reporting, tough, dogged in- vestigative work—that’s essential for a free society and should never go away. Might ink and pulp be replaced by a tablet? Not only likely, but probable.


JOSH CUTLER ’94 Government major; JD, Suffolk University Law School Publisher, Clipper Press (incl. Duxbury Clipper) Duxbury, Mass.


WHAT DREW YOU TO THE NEWS? I joined in my freshman year. The paper had been shut down as a result of turmoil between the former editor


Skidmore News alumni reflect on the impact of their student journalism then and now


INTERVIEWS BY HELEN S. EDELMAN ’74 (SKIDMORE NEWSEDITOR, 1972–73)


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