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ROLLING STOCK


Transport designer Paul Priestman has unveiled his latest concept – high-speed trains that need not stop at stations, instead ‘docking’ with moving trams as they pass towns and cities, with people moving across while both are in motion at about 60mph. He talked RTM through his radical idea…


It


is a problem that continues to bedevil proponents of high-speed rail:


the


unfeasibility of lines ploughing straight through the cities that services will call at, and so instead the requirement to build parkway-type stations outside those cities. Getting people to and from these out-of- town stations adds time onto their jour-


neys, and creates further headaches for transport planners.


Train designer Paul Priestman, of design consultants Priestmangoode, thinks he may have the long-term solution, which he calls ‘moving platforms’ – high-speed trains need not stop on their routes at all,


instead they can simply slow down and ‘dock’ with trams or traditional rail ser- vices on adjacent tracks, allowing people to go straight onto local or suburban public transport without the need for interchange stations. This also means high-speed ser- vices can be quicker, and waste less energy and time accelerating and slowing down.


rail technology magazine Jun/Jul 11 | 97


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